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AESCULAPIAN 

1967 



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COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

COLLEGE OF 
PHYSICIANS 

AND 

SURGEONS 



NEW YORK CITY 




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AESCULAPIAN 

1967 



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ad:' 




THE OATH OF HIPPOCRATES 



I swear by Apollo the physician, and Aesculapius, and Hy- 
geia, and Panacea, and all the gods and goddesses, that accord- 
ing to my ability and judgement I will keep this oath and this 
stipulation: to reckon him who taught me this Art equally dear 
to me as my parents, to share my substance with him and re- 
lieve his necessities if required; to look upon his offspring as 
my own brothers and to teach them this Art, if they shall wish 
to learn it, without fee or stipulation; and that by precept, 
lecture, and every other mode of instruction I will impart a 
knowledge of the Art to my own sons and those of my teach- 
ers, and to disciples bound by a stipulation and oath accord- 
ing to the law of medicine, but to none others. I will follow 
that system of regimen which according to my ability and 
judgement I consider for the benefit of my patients, and 
abstain from whatever is deleterious and mischievous. I will 
give no deadly medicine to anyone if asked, nor suggest any 
such counsel; and in like manner I will not give to a wom- 
an a pessary to produce abortion. With purity and with ho- 
liness I will pass my life and practice my Art. I will not cut 
persons laboring under the stone, but will leave this to be 
done by men who are practitioners of this work. Into whatever 
houses I enter I will go into them for the benefit of the sick 
and will abstain from every voluntary act of mischief and 
corruption; and further, from the seduction of females and 
males, of freemen and slaves. Whatever, in connection with 
my professional practice or not in connection with it. I see or 
hear in the life of men which ought not to be spoken of abroad. 
I will not divulge, as reckoning that all such should be kept 
secret. While I continue to keep this oath unviolated may it be 
granted to me to enjoy life and the practice of the Art, re- 
spected by all men and all times. But should I trespass and 
violate this oath may the reverse be my lot. 




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FOR TBB POOR OF HEW /OR 
without ?|E3&FID TO 

RACz,CR5ED OR CO, 

SUPPORTS^ 3Y 

OLJMT/.RY COHTRSJ 




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COLUMBIA-PRESBYTERIAN MEDICAL CENTER 
DIRECTORY 

KttTM. AMU C KAKEU "ALL 



couinbu uwvEtsrn 


NEuftOlQStCAl INSTITUTE 




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NEW YORK OrTHOMEDH: HOSWTAL 


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OUTMTIEVT CIWICS 


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tuumcss-H 


WC5S ICMOMH. MU. 


- ilNNNNNNNNNNl ■STTTUTE, STATE OF CV TOM 


; MES8TTe»lAN MSfflAL 


NSTTTUTE OF 


OfKfNMMOiMT SOUlOjJKOUWCM. CIHIC 

WASHIN6T0N HEIGHTS HEALTH CENTER. CITY OF N.Y. 



To Harold W. Brown 




This yearbook is dedicated to Dr. Harold W. Brown bv the members of the class of 1967. In 1943. 
as Professor of Parasitology, he organized the first separate course in Parasitic Diseases given at P & S. 
It is in recognition of the quality of this course and the broad contribution it has made to our education 
that we wish to remember Dr. Brown. His lectures are a delight— beautifully organized, clearly 
presented, and filled with relevant humor. His textbook shows these same characteristics and is 
remarkable for a medical textbook in the ease and effectiveness with which it communicates. Apart 
from the excellence of his course, we shall remember him for his enthusiasm and human values. 

Dr. Brown points out the world-wide importance of diseases seldom seen in our country and the 
relationship of ignorance, poverty, religion, and customs to their spread. He has enabled many of us 
to participate in these medical problems first-hand in his overseas program, Medicine in the Tropics. 

Dr. Brown is a dedicated teacher who obviously enjoys life. The world has been his classroom. He 
organized the medical school of the University' of Puerto Rico and reorganized the medical school 
of the National Taiwan University. Ethiopia, Haiti, Java, Bali, Malaysia, and Korea all know him. 
We students sense his enjoyment of teaching. We respond to it. Learning becomes stimulating, and. 
of great importance, fun. 



To the Class of 1967 



Dear Colleagues, 

You may be sure that I have greatly enjoyed the pleasure of your company over the past four years, 
in the lecture hall, laboratory, Presbyterian Hospital wards, and in hospitals abroad during the 
Medicine in the Tropics electives. Education is not a one-way affair, but a mutually stimulating 
activity. The class of 1967 has added much to my education, and I hope I have contributed per- 
manently to yours. 

Patient care is most important and it is obvious that you are seriously concerned with your 
patients' medical problems. The patient is also a person and should be so treated, as his disease is 
only a part of him. Important as it is that we take our medical work seriously, on the other hand, 
life is more enjoyable when one does not take himself too seriously. Few physicians, even professors, 
are omniscient. We of the medical profession are doubly blessed for we go through life doing some 
good and at the same time enjoying our work immensely. Making our living is measured by what we 
get, and our life by what we give. 

May vour footsteps be fortunate and your shadows never grow less. 

Harold W. Brown 



Dr. Brown worked on the treat- 
ment of hookworm for the Frontier 
Nursing Service, Kentucky, 1929. 



In 1954, he received an honorary L.L.D. degree from 
the University of Puerto Rico where he organized their 
medical school. 




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ADMINISTRATION 




H. HOUSTON MERRITT 

Dean of the Faculty of Medicine 

Henry and Lucy Moses Professor of 

Neurology 

Chairman, Department of Neurology 

B.A., Vanderbilt, 1922 

M.D., Johns Hopkins, 1926 

M.A. (hon.), Harvard, 1942 




GEORGE A. PERERA 

Associate Dean 

Professor of Medicine 

B.A., Princeton, 1933 

M.D., Columbia, 1937; 

Med.Sc.D.. 1942 





MELVIX D. YAHR 

Assistant Dean 

Professor of Neurology 

B.A., New York University, 

1939; M.D., 1943 



J. FREDERICK EAGLE 

Assistant Dean 

Associate Professor of Pediatrics 

B.A., Yale, 1940 

M.D.. Columbia, 1943 




10 



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YEARS 



1963-65 



Anatomy 




RICHARD P. BUNGE For my re- 
search this year Tm working on the 
Sassoon phenomenon. 





MELVIN L. MOSS Yeah, I used to be a 
tooth jockey. What of it? 




WILFRED M. Copenhaver By popular de- 
mand Tm repeating my red cell lecture. 



GEORGE D. PaPPAS Sure Fll pose for 
you if you'll promise to let me show you 
my electron microscope. 






Herbert O. Elftman They tell 

me if you lock a monkey in a room 
with a typewriter he'll eventually 
publish a book. 




Charles R. Xoback 
minute — this isn't a brain. 



Hey, wait a 



Malcolm B. Carpenter / can never 
remember the cranial nerves without 
my favorite mnemonic — Oh, Oh, Oh, To 
Touch and Feel 





It'll all make sense in the end?? 



13 




Nancy Trotter Should I pull 
my skirt up a little more? 



ALBERT For an extra five 1 can 
get you something from the fash- 
ionable upper east side. 







WILLIAM M. ROGERS // the ma- 
chine doesn't work I can always do 
my animal immitations. 



14 




David Rittenberc You got a good 
grade for a liberal arts major— an F. 




The HO-HO phenomenon 




Seymour Lieberma.N I've just dis- 
covered a new hormone that takes 
hair off your head and puts it on 
yourface. 



Biochemistry 




DAVID SHEMIN If they don't like my bilirubin 
lecture I can always go back to the Mr. Clean 
commercials. 



MAX A. ElSENBERG Of course, 24-hour urine 
specimens can be a bit cumbersome. 




15 




ALVIN I. KRASNA One methionine malted coming 
up. 



ERW'IN Chargaff / think thi. 
DNA stuff is just a passing fad 



PAR1THYCHERY SRINIVASAN Chlorophyll makes 
your breath kissing sweet. 





H 

it 

IS ill! 




DAVID NACHMANSOHN / cannot belicvi 
mother nature would have it any other way 



16 




Physiology 




LOUIS T. ClZEK 1 don't feel right until 
Vve had my morning cup of urea. 




JOHN V. TaGGART You don't have to read 
Bard from cover to cover. You can always 
repeat the course in the summer. 



WILLIAM L. NaSTUK As long as you're up, 
get me a giant squid axon on the rocks. 







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MARTIN BLANK This year I'm volunteer- 
ing my head as a dialysis bag. 





Richard C. Mason What do you suppose this 
little thing is? 



MERO NOCENTI I've just synthesized a 
new sex hormone. I think I'll test it on 
Dr. Root. 




WILLIAM W. WaLCOTT Now you've done it. 
Your turtle is in congestive heart failure. 



18 




g^ fifiim* 




ElAIMOND EMMERS Presto— decerebrate. 



SHU CHIEN But sir. two orders of fortune 
cookies will increase your gastric motility 
five-fold. 





Brian F. HOFFMAN You don't understand the exam. 
The idea is not to get the correct answer, but to 
outguess the department. 



Pharmacology 




LOWELL M. GREEXBAl'M How many bags of 
nickel H? 



19 




Herbert J. Bartelstone This ought to 
really mess up his autonomic nervous sys- 
tem. 




WILBUR H. SAWYER Smile, you're on Candid 
Camera. 




DONALD H. SINGER Winner of the 
McBride Award for public speaking. 



Frederick G. Hofmann Want a fix? 




SHIH-CHUNWANG Watch him womit. 




20 



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Microbiology 



CaLDERON Howe W/jo smeared feces on the 



eyep 



eyepiece? 




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Harrv \l. ROSE In his spare time this well- 
known pianist serves as chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Microbiology. 



Gabriel C. Godman You probably 
didn't recognize me without my dark 
glasses. 



ELVIN A. KabaT I think I've fallen in love 
with Anna Pliylaxis. 



Sam M. BEISER My grin grew out E. coli. 




21 





Councilman morgan Admittedly 
my scientific achievements have been 
microscopic. 



HERBERT ROSENKRANZ Hello, security; 
better send up a couple of men, Rosen- 
kranz is playing with the machine again. 



J.C.I.'s playmate of the month 




PAUL D. ELLNER Come in and pull up a 
loose brown stool. 





Bernard F. Erlanger You look like 
you could stand a little culture. 



22 




Pathology 




i • 



JOSEPH WIENER / think I'd better go to 
the men's room. 





DONALD G. McKAY You say you've found a 
case with NO intravascular clotting? 



Stanley Simbonis What, me worry? 



David SPIRO // / don't get my overcoat 
back, everybody fails. 








1 






23 




HENRY A. AZAR Had any lately? 




David Cowen He puts me to sleep too. 




William A. Blanc Zank heaven for 
little girls. 



Abner Wolf Zz 




24 




Austin d. Johnston Wrap it up for 
my dog. 




Nathan Lane At the Bard Hall cafeteria 
this specimen carried a diagnosis of lamb 
curry. 




MEYER M. MELICOW The biopsy 
showed florid honeymoon cystitis. 



RAFFAELE LaTTES "No bubble is so iridescent 
or floats longer than that blown by the successful 
teacher." 

OSLER 




I 




25 




26 




CLINICAL 
YEARS 



1965-67 



27 



Medicine 





HENRY ARANOW My son, the doctor. 



Stanley E. Bradley Charts, slides, tape record- 
ings, movies— yes. But dancing girls? 



CHARLES A. Ragan I'd rather switch 
than fight. 




DANIEL V. KIMBERG "Talk of your science! after all is 
said/ There's nothing like a bare and shiny head." 

O. W. Holmes 




28 




r ^ 



L I c 



Dr. Bradley, it's right on the tip of my finger. 




Richard J. Stock Let's see, 0.25 mg. of 
digoxin plus 0.25 mg. ofdigoxin equals . . . .? 





•<- 



JOHN E. ULTMANN 1 vill gif you 
only my name, rank, und hemo- 
globin. 



STUART W. COSGRIFF If anticoagulation 
doesn't work we'll have to ligate the sper- 
matic vein. 



Henry O. Wheeler Hey, George, get a 
load of the next case. 

0M 



29 




DANA W. ATCHLEY How many times a iveek? 



Nicholas P. Christy I think you'll get 
better treatment at Roosevelt. 








Felix E. Demartini What beauti- 
ful rheumatoid nodules you have! 



Sidney C. Werner Man ofLaMancha 




30 



{ 




Andre F. Cournand & 

Dickinson W. Richards 
Winners of the Nobel Prize for their 
work on cardio-pulmonary physi- 
ology. 





M. IRENE FERRER Take the shortcut to 
34th Street through the Bundle of Kent. 




GEORGE W. MELCHER That ap- 
praisal note stinks. 




CHARLES A. FLOOD This is a great pas- 
trami sandwich. 



31 




DeWitt Goodman He had 

an elevated serum sour 
cream . . . 



DAVID SCHACHTER ■ ■ ■ by the in- 
verted gut sack technique . . . 



Charles L. Christian . . . 
which did not respond to 
steroids. 



REJANE M. HaRVEY Wanna fight 
about it? 



f -■"* -^^n K 


rif*! 


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Alfred P. Fishman Sir, did you say 
you wanted your coffee black? 



32 




Albert R. Lamb, Jr Which comes first, 
the systolic or diastolic? 




ALBERT W. GROKOEST You can't 
fight city hall. 




JOHN H. LARAGH / don't understand it 
either, but it's good for a lot of papers. 



ALFRED Gellhorn "His life was gentle and the 
elements so mixed in him that nature might stand 
up and say to all the world that this was a man." 

Shakespeare 



Frederick a. Klipstein A proven case 
of pastrami-fast achlorhydria. 






ROBERT F. LOEB Bard Professor Emeri- 
tus of Medicine 




KERMIT L. PINES Fifty dollars to win 
on Sugar Daddy. 



Hamilton Southworth If the lecture was 
so instructive, why was I the only one taking 
notes? 




DONALD F. TAPLEY "Alice said, 7 wish you wouldn't 
keep appearing and vanishing so suddenly; you make 
one quite giddy. 'I 'All right,' said the Cat; and this 
time it vanished quite slowly, beginning with the 
end of the tail and ending with the grin which re- 
mained some time after the rest of it had gone." 

Lewis Carroll 





34 




YALE KNEELAND, JR. If there's anything which be- 
trays an amateur, it's the manner in which he per- 
cusses. / don't care what you HEAR when percuss- 
ing, but for God sakes. make it LOOK professional! 



Well, I must say I'm not impressed with 
those rales. 




1 



ARTHUR R. VVERTHEIM Don't feel sorry for the 
patients, I've been here longer than they have. 





Elliott F. Osserman Just the usual— 
CBC, urinalysis, and Immunoelectro- 
phoresis. 



35 




GEORGE A. Perera What happened to 
me was a little pill called Compoz. 



GERARD M. TURINO Now that Al has 
left . . . 





FREDERICK R. BAILEY "Nothing is more esti- 
mable than a physician who, having studied 
nature from his youth, knows the properties of 
the human body, the diseases which assail it, the 
remedies which will benefit it, exercises his art 
with caution, and pays equal attention to the 
rich and the poor." 

Voltaire 




EDGAR LEIFER Boy, I like it up here at 
Man/ Harkncss. 



36 





The medical student sees 
the patient first. 





kTr> 1 »' 




Goldwater medicine 




Surgery 




George H. Humphreys II But how 
can a whole department have adynamic 
ileus? 




John M. Kinney I think I'll have to 
refer you to a surgeon for this problem. 




ROBERT B. HIATT Why, yes, they did 
name the Hiatus hernia after me. 



GEORGE F. CRIKELAIR Did you hear 
about the plastic surgeon who hung him- 
self? 




38 




CUSHMAN D. HaaGENSEN Nurse, this 
patient is a male. 




Hugh Auchincloss, Jr. Why do these 
students write such damned Ion" histories? 






James R. Malm It's simple, I use 
Helena Rubenstein pancake. 




CARL R. Feind Handle it carefidly, it's 
a hot nodule. 



Robert H.E. Elliott, Jr. I think 
it's an indirect hernia. 





DAVID V. Habif Have I got soma 
rumors to tell t/ou! 




Milton R. Porter In the Noli/ we 
used to just tape it back on. 




FERDINAND F. MCALLISTER Still 

clumping, eh? 








x 






V^ 



>" 



) 



Harold G. Barker Well, . . . how 
muc/i can you afford? 



40 





JOHN SciDDER Hey, come back with my 
glove. 



ROBERT H. WYLIE If there's any 
doubt, just take it out. 



Philip d. wiedel Do we ALL 
have to make rounds at Harlem? 




Grant Sanger Gee, those are the big- 
gest ones I've ever seen. 




JOHN Prudden Indication? . 
four years of intractable diarhea. 




41 




Thomas V. Santulli / think 

my colostomy bag is leaking. 




JOSE M. FERRER Me read an 
EKG? 




ARTHUR B. VOORHEES Who said I have 
a Napoleonic complex? 




42 




Help, Tm not conductive! 





Anesthesiology 




Richard J. Kitz & Emanuel M. Papper 
The Kitzenpapper Kids 



GERALD L. Wolf An anesthetist is someone at 
the head of the table who's half awake keeping 
the patient half asleep. 





Gabriel G. Nahas They aren't 
polka dots, they're cyclopropane 
molecules. 




SHIH-HSUN Ngai You all took gas 
ori your exam. 



VIRGINIA APGAR A score of 11? Impossible! 








aa 



Leonard J. Goldwater Gold- 
finger 



Physical 
Medicine 




Preventive & 

Administrative 

Medicine 




Harold W. Brown The fiery serpent of the 
Israelites! That can't be my stool. 



Ray E. TRUSSELL Remember 
me? Remember Public Health? 



Robert C. Darling Insert a tube this 
size and the paralysis disappears. 




45 



Pediatrics 




EDWARD C. CURNEN, JR. Hi, boys and girls! 
Welcome to Smilin Ed's gang. 




*/ 



Sidney Blumenthal & Howard G. Bruexx 
(Medicine) Sidney, you sure lay down a good 
Tine test. 




William A. Silverman What do you say we cut out, 

baby? 



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\ 



L. Stanley James Fetus mellitus 



J. Frederick Eagle George is out of 
town; can I help you? 



Douglas S. Damrosch If worse comes to 
worse, Til teach all the nurses myself. 






RUTH C. HARRIS What's this recipe for 
kidney pie doing in my liver file? 



47 





JAMES A. WOLFF Cough up some marrow, 
kid. 



ROBERT W. WINTERS Nobody under- 
stands me. 



JOHN F. NICHOLSON You say you 
found somebody who speaks English? 



GILBERT W. MELLIN Hmmm, acid base 
balance? Wonder what that means. 



*l!!l 





Hattie E. Alexander Hattie lately? 



48 






J> 



Developing a rapport with the pa- 
tient. 





Dirty old man. 



Getting to the seat of the problem. 




49 



Otolaryngology 





ROBERT M. Hui They want me 
in the Red Guard. 



DANIEL C. Baker, Jr. Tonsils are my meat. 



JULES WALTNER If he can't afford an operation 
we'll just touch up his x-rays. 





MlLOS BASEK Somebody stop 
this room from spinning. 



50 



Dermatology 




F. Philip Lowen- 
FISH That's not a 
chronic dermatitis! 
It's my mustache. 



ANTHONY N. DOMON- 
KOS This should be a 
winning entry in the 
annual dermatology 

round-up in May. 



Carl T. Nelson 
B»f we have to take 
attendance and give 
exams. 





Ophthalmology 



A. GERARD DeVoe You mean to say you didn't 
like your third year ophthalmology? 



Charles A. Perera For 
you, George, half price. 




51 



Ob-Gyn 




J. GEORGE MOORE In psychiatry you learn to 
look at the patient as a whole, but here we re- 
verse this procedure. 



Howard C. Taylor, Jr. Yes, it is 
a bitter pill to swallow. 





Karlis Adamsons, Jr. & Vincent J. 
FREDA The blackout was here, and look 
at this peak nine months later. 




CHARLES M. STEER Well, Mrs. Brown, my calcula- 
tions indicate that tonite is prime time. 



ALBERT A. PLENTL Tonite at my private 
office . . . one thousand dollars cash. 



52 





Raymond L. Vande Wiele Clo- 

miphene tid . . . triplets, qid . . . 
(Iliads. 





ROBERT E. HALL To 
AB or not to AB? That 
_ is the question. 



w. Duane Todd 

Artificial insemination? 
I haven't done one in I 



months. 




Anna L. SOUTHAM A thou- 
sand dollars? 



Harold SPEERT These skin mags really turn 






D. Anthony D'Esopo Are 
you trying to seduce me, 
Miss Galore? 



Saul B. Gusberg 
Wouldn't you rather seduce 
me, Miss Galore? 





Gilbert J. Vosburgh Would you be- 
lieve this fed you for nine months? 



LANDRUM B. SHETTLES "Is this a dagger which 1 
see before me, the handle toward my hand?" 

Shakespeare 




n^H 








William V. Cavanagh Yes, I still like 
to keep my finger in the pie. 



Orlando J. Miller / dream of 
Harry with the light brown genes. 




54 



1 



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I 



Neurology 



i 




Sidney Carter Quick get a tongue 
blade, I'm having my aura! 





H. HOUSTON MERRITT All this is my domain. 



Carmine T. Vicale Very good, Mrs. 
Jones. Now take your right heel and run 
it from your left axilla to your pubic 
symphysis. 




MELVIN D. Yahr You say 
you have diplopia? 



J. LAWRENCE POOL (Neuro- 
surgery) A hemispherectomy is 
actually a very innocuous pro- 
cedure. 




53 



Orthopedics 





CHARLES S. NEER II Nobody passed the 
exam, but you set a new record for total 
amount of coffee consumed. 



Frank E. Stinchfield "'What! don't you 
know what a Sawbones is, Sir?', inquired Mr. 
Weller. 7 thought everybody know'd as a Saw- 



bones was a Surgeon.' " 



Charles Dickens 



Sawnie R. Gaston Honest, 
ma'am, it actually feels good. 



Charles T. Ryder I 
say the whosis is con- 
nected to the whatcha- 
macallit. 




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Harrison L. McLaughlin How do I 
treat a Colic's fracture? Why, I just fix it. 



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ROBERT E. CARROLL You don't know what this smells 
like? 





Alexander Garcia Where 
are all my students? They'll 
be late for the coffee break. 




C. Andrew L. Bassett Yes, I 
know it's 100% safe, but haven't 
you got something softer? 



Joseph E. Salvatore 
/ get thirty-five dollars for this 
one, but, of course, it's a dollar 
extra if I use gloves. 





David L. Andrews 
Mender of broken limbs. 



57 



Psychiatry 




LAWRENCE C. KOLB Your screening tests show 
that you're immature, psychically promiscuous, 
borderline alcoholic, and a past chapter presi- 
dent of the DAR. 




DONALD BELL & ROBIN BELL Ding dong belk. 




William A. Horwitz Take it 
away Chet in Washington. 




SIDNEY Malitz Actually I have a 
batch brewing in my cellar right now. 



DONALD S. KORNFELD You're neither psy- 
chotic nor neurotic. You're just a stupid 
jerk. 



58 





Supratentorial phenomena 




Israel Kesselbrexner And next I'd 
like to present. . . . Julius Caesar. 





William S. Laxgford Why don't be 
silly, I sometimes wet the bed myself. 



H. Donald Dunton It's easy once 
you learn to love the little brats. 




PHILLIP PolaTIN If you think neurosis 
is bad, you should try hemorhoids. 



59 



Radiology 





Juan M. Taveras Too dumb to 
take a history? Here's why. 



William B. Seaman They said we 
weren't allowed to develop this kind of 
pictures. 




Ralph Schlaeger 
Notice the positive 
Schlaeger's sign. 




DAVID H. Baker You find foreign bod- 
ies in the strangest places. 



Kent Ellis How long do 1 
have to retain this barium? 



60 





John - K. Lattimer I said let go! 




Hans H. Zinsser So she told me to 
keep my Hans to myself. 




Urology 




George W. Fish Gee whiz! 




Archie L. Dean Don't fire 'til you see 
the whites of their thighs. 



Vernon Smith If you can get your 
finger in, you can get your foot in. 



61 




62 







t il-" 




fc£* 




THE 

CLASS 

OF 

1967 



63 




ALEXANDER McF. 

ACKLEY, JR. 

29 Cross Gates 

Madison, N.T. 

B.S.E., Princeton, 1962 

MEDICINE 



NILE L. ALBRIGHT 

167 Dudley Road 

Newton Center, Mass. 

A.B., Harvard, 1961 

VASCULAR SURGERY, 

IMMUNOLOGY 





HELEN GARSHANIN 
ALBANESE 
217 Haven Ave. 
New York, N.Y. 
B.A., N.Y.U.,1962 
PSYCHIATRY 






RONALD C. ALLISON 

225 Highland Ave. 

New Kensington, Pa. 

A.B., Yale, 1963 

SURGERY 




V 

1 




RICHARD A. 
ALBANESE 
217 Haven Ave. 
New York, N.Y. 
B.A., Princeton, 1962 
MEDICINE 



WILLIAM B. 

ANDREWS 

Whitaker Mill Road 

Joppa, Maryland 

A.B., Princeton, 1963 

PEDIATRICS 




64 




CHARLES M.BALCH 
2637 Barrington Drive 
Toledo, Ohio 
B.S..U. of Toledo, 1964 
SURGERY 



JONATHAN K. 

BELCHER 

Town Hill Farm 

Lakeville, Conn. 

A.B., Princeton, 1962 

SURGERY 





JOSEPH M. BALLO 
1420 Parkch ester Road 
New York, N.Y. 
B.S., Manhattan, 1962 
PATHOLOGY 




WALTER E. BERGER, III 

18 Jefferson Street 

Garden City, N.Y. 

B.S.E., Princeton, 1960 

MEDICINE 




t 



I 




RICHARD D. 

BANYARD 

3220 Netherland Ave. 

New York, N.Y. 

A.B., Princeton, 1963 

OPHTHALMOLOGY 



JAMES D. BILES, III 

1442 Goodbar Ave. 

Memphis, Tenn. 

B.A., Yale, 1963 

UROLOGY 




65 




ROBERT G. BLABEY, 

JR. 

22 N. Pine Ave. 

Albany, N.Y. 

A.B., Hamilton, 1963 

SURGERY 



HOWARD L. 

BRENSILVER 

990 Dana Ave. 

Valley Stream, N.Y. 

A.B., Columbia, 1963 

MEDICINE 





JOHN C. BOWEN, III 
528 Knight Ave. 
Forrest City, Ark. 
B.A., Yale, 1963 
SURGERY 



DAVID C. BREWSTER 

45 Christopher St. 

New York, N.Y. 

B.A., Trinity, 1963 

SURGERY 





FRANKLIN E. 

BRAGG, II 

11 Graham Ave. 

Bangor, Maine 

B.A., Amherst, 1963 

MEDICINE 



JOHNM. BRILEY,JR. 

West River Road 

Perrysburg, Ohio 

A.B., Harvard, 1963 

PEDIATRICS 




66 




ROGER P. 
CHRISTEXSEX 
1445 X. Nye Ave. 
Fremont, Xeb. 
A.B., Grinnell, 1963 
MEDICINE 



ROBERT A. CLARK 

107 Concord Place 

Syracuse, X.Y. 

A.B., Syracuse, 1963 

MEDICINE 





THOMAS B. 
CHRISTEXSEX 
1445 X. Nye Ave. 
Fremont, Neb. 
A.B., Grinnell, 1963 
MEDICINE 



BERXARD H. COHEX 

59 Locust Street 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

A.B., Wilkes, 1963 
DERMATOLOGY 





PRESTON R. CLARK, 

JR. 

107 Genesee Street 

Xew Hartford, X.Y. 

A.B., Cornell, 1963 

SURGERY 



MYLES J. COHEX 

4019 Santa Ana Dr. 

El Paso, Texas 

A.B., Princeton, 1963 

SURGERY 




67 




MICHAEL R. CURCI 

1777 Grand Concourse 

Bronx, N.Y. 

B.A., Princeton, 1963 

SURGERY 



JOHN H. FEIBEL 

9002 Daly Road 

Cincinatti, Ohio 

B.A., Pennsylvania, 1963 

SURGERY 





ROGER T. 

DeANGELIS 

27 Windsor Terrace 

Yonkers, N.Y. 

A.B., Columbia, 1963 

SURGERY 



FREDRIC O. 

FINKELSTEIN 

45 Sutton Place South 

New York, N.Y. 

B.A., Yale, 1963 

MEDICINE 





MICHAEL A. DREW 

15 River Glen 

Hastings-on-Hudson, 

N.Y. 

B.S., M.I.T., 1959 

SURGERY 



THOMAS C. 

FLEMING 

211 Fort Washington 

Ave. 

New York, N.Y. 

A.B., Kenyon,1963 

ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY 




68 




JOHN WILLIAM 
FOLLOWS, JR. 
42 Greenwav Terrace 
Forest Hills, N.Y. 
B.A., Yale, 1963 
ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY 



JOHN E. GAINES 

105 East 80th Street 

New York, N.Y. 

B.S., Trinity, 1963 

OB-GYN 





RICHARD FRANK 
89-71 217 Street 
Queens Village, N.Y. 
B.A., Columbia, 1963 
SURGERY 



DANIEL J. GARNETT 

285 Lexington Ave. 

Passaic, N.J. 

A.B., Dartmouth, 1964 

SURGERY 





KAREN K. FU 

F3, Mirador Mansion 

Nathan Road, Kowloon 

Hong Kong, B.C.C. 

B.A., Barnard, 1963 

RADIOLOGY 



STEPHEN L. 

GARRELL 

2708 Avenue P 

Brooklvn, N.Y. 

B.Ch.E., Cornell, 1963 

MEDICINE 




69 




MARCIA GETZ 

GERBER 

52 Marion Ave. 

Hartsdale, N.Y. 

A.B.,Vassar,1963 

MEDICINE 



LESLIE HARTLEY 

GISE 

8 East 96th Street 

New York, N.Y. 

B.A., Bryn Mawr, 1963 

PEDIATRICS, 

PSYCHIATRY 





HAROLD GERMAN 
140 Glenwood Ave. 
Jersey City, N.J. 
A.B., Princeton, 1963 
MEDICINE 



DULANEY GLEN 

Muttontown Rd, Box 195 

Syosset, N.Y. 

B.A., Yale, 1955 

MEDICINE 





^ -^6^ 



FREDERICK M. 

GISE 

8 East 96th Street 

New York, N.Y. 

A.B., Columbia, 1963 

MEDICINE 



A.fc 



ROBERT A. 

GREENBERGER 

14 Melmore Gardens 

East Orange, N.J. 

B.A., Rutgers, 1963 

OR-GYN 




70 




ROBERTA. 
GROSSMAN 
French town, N.J. 
A.B., Lafayette, 1963 
MEDICINE 



CHARLES J. HODGE, 

JR. 

2195 Central Road 

Fort Lee, N.J. 

A.B., Princeton, 1963 

SURGERY 





CHARLES HAMLIN 
270 Benefit Street 
Providence, R.I. 
B.A., Yale, 1961 
ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY 



FREDERICK C. 

HOLSCHUH 

56 Cove Road 

Huntington, N.Y. 

B.S., Rensselaer, 1963 

PEDIATRICS, 

MISSIONARY MEDICINE 





ERNST HEILBRUNN 
589 Shaler Blvd. 
Ridgefield, N.J. 
B.M.E., C.C.N.Y., 1957 

MEDICINE 



JOHN S. HOWLAND 

Teewaddle Hill Road 

Amherst, Mass. 

B.A., Yale, 1963 

PSYCHIATRY 




71 




RICHARD A. HURD, 
JR. 

994 Buckingham Circle 

N.W. 

Atlanta, Georgia 

Emory, 1963 

SURGERY 



BRUCE C. JOHNSTON 

1201 San Rafael St. 

San Leandro, Calif. 

A.B., Stanford, 1962 

PSYCHIATRY 





ANTHONY L. 
IMBEMBO 

2641 Marion Ave. 

Bronx, N.Y. 

A.B., Columbia, 1963 

SURGERY 



ROBERT DeWITT S. 

JONES 

315 Foster Drive 

Des Moines, Iowa 

B.A., Yale, 1963 

SURGERY 





WILLIAM G. 

JOHNSON 

2221 Beechwood Ave. 

Wilmette, Illinois 

A.B., Princeton, 1963 

MEDICINE 



T. STEPHEN JONES, 

JR. 

88 Columbink Road 

Milton, Mass. 

B.A., Yale, 1963 

MEDICINE 




72 




CAROL A. KAISER 
Beaver Drive 
Locust Valley, N.Y. 
B.S., Tufts, 1963 
MEDICINE 



ROBERT V. KNAPP 

659 W. 162nd Street 

New York, N.Y. 

B.A., Harvard, 1962 

MEDICINE 





KATE KILLEBREW 
5410 Shriver Ave. 
Des Moines, Iowa 
B.A.,Swarthmore,1961 
M.A., Radcliffe, 1962 
MEDICINE 



BENETS. KOLMAN 

113 Greenacres 

Brevard, N.C. 

A.B., Harvard, 1963 

MEDICINE 





GORDON J. 
KIRSCHBERG 
4742 Lacombe Ave. 
Montreal, Que., Canada 
' B.S., McGill, 1963 
NEUROLOGY 



GORDON I. KUSTER 

116 Grove Street 

Tarrvtown, N.Y. 

B.A., Yale, 1963 

MEDICINE 





* 



73 




WILLIAM M. LEE 
2688 Crompond Road 
Yorktown Heights, N.Y. 
A.B., Amherst, 1963 
MEDICINE 



RICHARD J. 

MACKLER 

99 Mohawk Drive 

West Hartford, Conn. 

A.B., Harvard, 1961, 

M. A., 1963 

MEDICINE 





NELSON L. LEVY 
571 Watchung Road 
Bound Brook, N.J. 
B. A., Yale, 1 963 
PEDIATRIC SURGERY 



DOUGLAS D. U. 
McKANE 

35 Roosevelt Street 

Garden City, N.Y. 

B.A., Adelphi, 1963 

SURGERY 





JOSEPH A. 

MacFARLAND 

Elmont, N.Y. 

B.S., Manhattan, 1961 

MEDICINE 



THOMAS E. 

McNAMARA 

8352 S. Marshfield Ave. 

Chicago, Illinois 

B. A., Johns Hopkins, 

1963 

SURGERY 




74 




GRIER H. MERVVIN 
4113 49th Street N.W. 
Washington, D.C. 
A.B., Duke, 1963 
SURGERY, UROLOGY 



ALEXANDER C. 

MORGAN 

3445 Stratford Road 

Atlanta, Georgia 

B.S., Davidson, 1963 

MEDICINE 





ANN M. BOYER MILIC 
404 W. 116th Street 
New York, N.Y. 
B.S., Columbia, 1961 
MEDICINE, OB-GYN 



ROBERT P. MYERS 

15 West Street 

Waterville, Maine 

A.B., Yale, 1963 

MEDICINE 





EDWARD J.MILLER 

133 Riverlawn Ave. 
Watertown, Wis. 
A.B., Harvard, 1963 
MEDICINE 



KENNETH K. 

NAKANO 

1143 S. Victoria Ave. 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

B.A., Pomona, 1963 

NEUROLOGY 




75 




GORDON L. NOEL 
412 Beverly 
Missoula, Mont. 
A.B., Harvard, 1963 
MEDICINE 



CORNELIUS 
OLCOTT, IV 

218 E. Harrison 

Harlingen, Texas 

A.B., Princeton, 1963 

SURGERY 





STANLEY F. NOVAK 
5000 Broadway 
New York, N.Y. 
B.A., C.C.N.Y., 1963 
PEDIATRICS 



DAVID D. OLDS 

1160 Windsor Ave. 

Windsor, Conn. 

B.A., Yale, 1960 

MEDICINE 





GEORGE S. NOVALIS 
6044 Spencer Ave. 
New York, N.Y. 
A.B., Columbia, 1963 
OPHTHALMOLOGY 



DANIEL B. PENNER 

65 E. 96th Street 

New York, N.Y. 

A.B., Yale, 1962 

MEDICINE 




76 




SAMUEL W. PERRY, 

III 

Valhalla 

New Castle, Pa. 

A.B., Princeton. 1963 

PSYCHIATRY 



ARTHUR C. 

POLLACK 

185 Erasmus Street 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

B.S., Hobart, 1963 

SURGERY 





FRANK A. PETITO. JR. 
89 Galbreath Drive 
Princeton, N.J. 
B.A., Princeton, 1963 
NEUROLOGY 



DANIEL S. RAABE, 

JR. 

132 Ramsey Ave. 

Yonkers, N.Y. 

B.A., Colgate, 1963 
MEDICINE 





CAROLYN M. PIERI 
9 YV. Putteney Street 
Coming, N.Y". 
B.A., Oberlin, 1963 
PSYCHIATRY 
PEDIATRICS 



ROBERT RODYIEN 

.30.50 Fairfield Ave. 

Riverdale, N.Y. 

A.B., Columbia, 1963 

MEDICINE 




77 




JAYB. ROHRLICH 
96 5th Avenue 
New York, N.Y. 
B.A., Williams, 1963 
PSYCHIATRY 



GERALD STEPHEN 

ROSENBLUM 

22 Lawrence Street 

New Hyde Park, N.Y. 

B.A., Amherst, 1963 

MEDICINE 





QUINN B. ROSEFSKY 
1 Stratford Place 
Binghamton, N.Y. 
B.A., Yale, 1963 

MEDICINE 



ROBERT M. RUSSELL 

52 Leonard Street 

Gloucester, Mass. 

A.B., Harvard, 1963 

MEDICINE 





MARVIN ROSEN 
43 Indiana Ave. 
Long Beach, N.Y. 
B.A., Columbia, 1963 
PEDIATRICS 



DAVID J. 

SCHEINHORN 

120 E. Loines Ave. 

Merrick, N.Y. 

A.B., Princeton, 1963 

MEDICINE 




.▲ 1 



78 




PAULA A. SCHMIDT 
Denmark, Maine 
B.S., Bates, 1963 
PEDIATRICS 



HENRY ASCHER 

SELLNER 

98 Park Terrace East 

New York, N.Y. 

B.A., Columbia, 1963 

OB-GYN 





RICHARD P. 

SCHNEIDER 

515 Hawthorne Trail 

Lakeland, Florida 

B.A., Emory, 1963 

MEDICINE 



STANLEY SHERMAN 

2146 79th Street 

Rrooklyn, N.Y. 

A.B., Columbia, 1963 

SURGERY 





HARVEY A. 

SCHNEIER 

32 Clover Park Drive 

Rochester, N.Y. 

A.B., Columbia, 1963 

MEDICINE 



LEONARD J. 

SHUKOVSKY 

197 Reach 137 Street 

fielle Harbor, N.Y. 

A.B., Dartmouth, 1963 

RADIOLOGY 




79 




FRED E. SILVERSTEIN 
105 Oakland Ave. 
Monroe, N.Y. 
B.A., Alfred, 1963 
ORTHOPEDIC 
SURGERY 



BALACHANDRAN 

DOBLI SRINIVASAN 

23 Haven Ave. 

New York, N.Y. 

B.A., Bard, 1959 

Ph.D., Columbia, 1964 

RESEARCH, 

OPHTHALMOLOGY 





ROBERT E. SLOANE 
15 S. Main Street 
Randolph, Mass. 
A.B., Harvard, 1963 
SURGERY 



CHARLES H. SRODES 

604 Pitcairn Place 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A.,Wesleyan,1963 

M EDICINE 





ROGER D. SPIER 
3 Standish Terrace 
DeWitt, N.Y. 
B.A., Hobart, 1963 
SURGERY 



SHERMAN C. STEIN 

7418 Malvern Ave. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

A.B., Pennsylvania, 1963 

NEUROSURGERY 




^ 





80 




ROBERTA. STOOKEV 

145 Pritchard Ave. 

Corning, N.Y. 

A.B., Hamilton, 1963 

OB-GYN 



JAN H. TILLISCH 

1069 Plummer Lane 

Rochester, Minn. 

B.A., Yale, 1962 

MEDICINE 





JAMES G. SWEENEY 
5138 Post Road 
New York, N.Y. 
B.S., Manhattan, 1963 
SURGERY 



DIANE GOLDBERG 

TRACHT 

283 Barr Ave. 

Teaneck, N.J. 

A.B., Bryn Maim, 1957 

RADIOLOGY 





RICHARD R. 

TAVERNETTI 

46 Maplewood Drive 

Salinas, Calif. 

B.S., California, 1960 

SURGERY 



GEORGE A. VIOLIN 

386 Fort Washington 

Ave. 

New York, N.Y. 

A.B., Columbia, 1963 

OPHTHALMOLOGY 




81 




LUCY A. WASKELL 
78 S. Welles Street 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
B.S., Venn State, 1963 
MEDICINE 



RICHARD N. 

WINICKOFF 
2100 Linwood Ave. 

Fort Lee, N.J. 

B.A., Harvard, 1963 

MEDICINE 





BARRY D. WENGLIN 

620 Fort Washington 

Ave. 

New York, N.Y. 

B.A., Columbia, 1963 

MEDICINE 



SAMUEL D. WINNER 

2745 Edge Hill Road 

Huntingdon Valley, Pa. 

B.A., Trinity, 1963 

ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY 





JAMES R. WILSON, JR. 
563 66th Street 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 
B.A., Wesleyan, 1963 
SURGERY 



RICHARD L. 

WINSLOW 

23 Coolidge Ave. 

Caribou, Maine 

B.A., Bowdoin, 1963 

MEDICINE 




82 




SALLY F. WISELEY 
625 W. 169th Street 
New York, N.Y. 
A.B., Radcliffe,195S 

MEDICINE 



PETER F. 

WOHLAUER 

3230 S. High 

Englewood, Colo. 

A.B., Harvard, 1962 

PSYCHIATRY 




Class Officers 



1963-1964 



19a5-1966 



President: Barry Wenglin 
Vice-President: John Briley 
Secretary: Marcia Gerber 
Treasurer: Alec Morgan 
P 6- S Club Representative: 



John Howland 



President: Frank Bragg 

Vice-President: Dan Raabe 

Secretary: Carol Kaiser 

Treasurer: Alec Morgan 

P &■ S Club Vice-President: Mike Curci 



1964-1965 



1966-1967 



President: Barry Wenglin 

Vice-President: Willie Lee 

Secretary: Marcia Gerber 

Treasurer: Alec Morgan 

Pi-S Club Secretary: T. Stephen Jones 



President: Dave Brewster 
Vice-President: Carl Srodes 
Secretary: Dee Tracht 
Treasurer: Harry German 
P ir S Club President: Mike Curci 



1963-1967 

Honor Committee Representatives: 

John Bowen 

Harvey Schneier 



83 



Alpha Omega Alpha 




Alpha Omega Alpha is a national medical honor society whose spirit is set forth in 
its motto, "To be worthy to serve the suffering." "It is the duty of members to promote 
its ideals, to foster the scientific and philosophical features of the medical profession, 
to look beyond self to the welfare of the profession and of the public, to cultivate so- 
cial mindedness as well as an individualistic attitude toward responsibilities, to show 
respect for colleagues and especially for elders and teachers, to foster research, and in 
all ways to ennoble the profession of medicine and advance it in public opinion. It is 
equally a duty to avoid what is unworthy, including the commercial spirit and all prac- 
tices injurious to the welfare of patients, the public or the profession. . . . 

The most prominent requisite of membership is high scholarship in a broad sense. 
Scholarship is more than a record of high average grades and facility in memorizing 
information. It connotes continuous industry, effectiveness in method of work, facility 
in correlating facts and in intellectual grasp that permits application of information to 
new problems. 

As aspects of and indispensable to true scholarship come open-mindedness, individ- 
uality, originality, demonstration of a studious attitude independent of teacher require- 
ments, and promise of intellectual growth. These are the qualities that must sustain the 
individual in his professional career. . . . 

Equal to these qualities comes moral character in its broadest sense, including un- 
selfishness, appreciation of obligation, reliability and honesty in all the affairs of life." 

From the Preamble and Constitution of Alpha Omega Alpha 



MEMBERS 



ELECTED MAY 1966 

Walter E. Berger III 

David C. Brewster 

Anthony L. Imbembo, President 

Gordon J. Kirschberg 

Robert E. Sloane, Secretary-Treasurer 

Richard N. WinickofF 



ELECTED NOVEMBER 1966 

Franklin E. Bragg II 
Robert A. Clark 
William M. Lee 
Joseph A. MacFarland 
Richard J. Mackler 
Cornelius Olcott IV 
Arthur C. Pollack 
Marvin Rosen 
Harvey A. Schneier 
Fred E. Silverstein 
James G. Sweeney 
George A. Violin 



84 



Class History 



I, Proteus, all things to all men, swarmer over 
all, seer and knower of all things pertinent to 
the class of 1967 of P&S am honored to be 
chosen to chronicle the epic saga of this class. 
Xo better man could have been chosen to cover 
this scene (if I may say), for I know just how- 
many months it took for Frank and Carol to 
come to terms, how Barry Wenglin got elected 
first year, and how Mr. Barton chooses his hired 




helpers. The proper seer must first know and 
understand the past and record it for genera- 
tions yet unborn, for what is past is prologue 
and all that sort of thing. 

It all began when the Dean garnered us 
from the land, held our applications in the 
palm of his hand, etc., etc. But things really got 
underway when the aforesaid dean told us not 
to take our stethoscopes 
(who had one?) on 
the subway and flail 
them about. Dr. Curnen 
the following morning 
showed us what a typi- 
cal lecture would be like 
and off we went. Where? 
Well, the first week we 
didn't really know, but 
it all became clear after 
a while. We found out 
where Rittenberg was to 
break his famous egg, 
and where O. J. Miller 
would teach genetics for 
the obstetrician. What 
we weren't prepared 
for was "afferent wol- 
ley" Emmers and the 
"zick and zin filaments" 
of Nachmansohn. Nor 




could anyone (except for myself, naturally) see 
the dark clouds on the horizon that foretold the 
Note Group Storm that was to come. But as the 
storm brewed it became a matter of honor for 
some not to be a member and for others a prag- 
matic matter, in fact a necessity, to join. Those 
who joined signified that they had given up 
learning the conventional way our grandfathers 
had used. To back up their position they invoked 
the ever widening horizon of medical facts, each 
one more indigestible than the last. Those who 
refused to join stuck with our forefathers, in- 
voked Herbert Hoover's and Dana Atchley's 
doctrine of hard work, and wondered whether 
those pro-note group weren't communist sympa- 
thizers. The Dean foresaw, with not a little 
rectitude, that the eventual outcome of the trend 
toward recording the spoken medical word 
might be closed circuit TV in every room in Bard 
Hall with re-runs in the evenings for those who 
spent their days appearing on quiz shows down- 
town. To thwart the trend his program of a 
voluntary cease-and-desist was strongly sug- 
gested. Those convinced that the old way was 
the best way had won the day. Poor Arthur 
Schlesinger, Jr. had just taken a room in Bard to 
chronicle the New Medical Education Deal. He 
had conferred with Sandy Ackley long enough 
to write his second Crisis of the Old Order when 
the news hit and he was sent packing back to 
Washington. 

Spring brought us to our senses; we gained 
confidence as we worked our way down the arm 
to the hand and finally threw away the legs. 




85 




the 8:19 to Chappaqua without his overcoat 
after the Path party and Frank Bragg got a 
B-plus for returning it the next day. 



On we went to the first year show. The medi- 
cal center community had the privilege of wit- 
nessing a most singular event, a clean AND 
funny first year show. John Daley said """^ 
Walter Kerr said, "Go see it," and Edwin Barton 
said, "Not in ten years has there been a show 
like it." Who would have said John Howland 
could put Karen Fu and Sam Winner on the 
same stage and come out the better for it? I 
would have said so, of course. 





Spring came again! The sun was bright as we 
climbed on the subway (stethoscopes flailing) 
or careened down to Bellevue on our newly- 
bought motorcycles. The smell of the East River 
from Welfare Island mingled daily with the 
Parasitology lab odors and young love was 
everywhere. 

That summer the scientist turned clinician as 
hundreds of Vacutainers drove deep into the 
flesh, not veins, of hundreds of ante-cubital 
fossae and psychiatric interviews left many 
otherwise well meaning students asking the 
question, 'Why do you ask?" to everything from 
"What's your name?" to "How long do I have to 
sit here?" We held the hooks, carried a healthy 



If first year dulled the senses, second year 
was the winter of our discontent. As the study 
material became vaguely medical the amount 
of what seemed absurd nit-picking (the stuff of 
medicine, after all) became astronomical. Dr. 
Wang described his (hold your nose when you 
say it) chemoreceptor trigger zone and could 
make a poor dog vomit at will or whoever else 
happened to be in the front row. The patholo- 
gists asked an illegal question— something not 
said in lecture at all. Dr. Spiro stumbled onto 



86 




looking Pres Clark around during an Emergency 
Drill, got drunk with the Professor of Path- 
ology- in the Great Blackout, and made a dis- 
grace of the class at the Christmas show. Fred 
and Leslie became the class' first nuptial product. 
Our third year spring and summer found 
Bruce Johnston and Sam Perry at the beach and 
Harry German playing the "fat boy from Jersey 
City" stunt on every tennis pro in the Borscht 
Belt. Steve Jones was planning rainy day activi- 
ties for the Cape while Dave Scheinhorn an- 
nounced that he liked girls "a bit fat." Innumera- 
ble others began seeking surgical internships 
on the West Coast— double heresy. 





Dean how he could be sixth-ranked in Eastern 
tennis and still tear through the rugged fourth 
year curriculum. A stampede to the altar re- 
sulted when certain members of the class con- 
templated a cold, lonely, debilitating internship 
after four cold, lonely, debilitating years of 
medical school. The fateful trips around the 
country to sell our wares resembled one-man 
road shows. Finally The List was drawn up. 
The unanswerable question became: "Should I 
put down Mother Cabrini or risk going un- 
matched?" Even the word has an unpleasant 
sound. Matching Day finally arrived and the 
fates of hundreds of lives were decided in 
seconds, it seemed. For some there was joy, 
for others justice, and for a few heartaches and 
second thoughts. 



As we waded into the fourth year the aware- 
ness that summer was for working was over- 
whelming. School began to seem more like job 
and portents of the intern's year were all around 
us. The class became so fragmented that no 
one could recall just how many children Del 
Glen had or was having or how short Ann Boyer 
Milic's skirts really were. Dean Perera spoke 
to each of us thus: "Snodgrass was a quiet boy 
from a nice family in Scarsdale— er Greenwich 
and did fairly well at Kentucky— ah, oh, yes, 
Yale, but then he came to P&S. . . ." Firestone 
telegraphed Dr. Brown when Mike Drew still 
hadn't arrived ten days after the beginning of 
the month— he'd started five days early. Dick 
Winickoff couldn't remember his name at the 
Mass General interview. Harry German, the 
class treasurer, was called in to explain to the 



Could we have known which internship was best; 

Could we but choose where we would get more rest, 

A chance to learn, with clerks to bum, 

Some erudite and some not quite. 

A few Mi's, low PBI's. 

And lest we run away with erudition, 

Once in a while a night-time admission 

To keep us on our toes and still in touch, 

Without disturbing sleeping very much. 

Some brilliant nurses to take care of all, 

And do the scut ( with clerks ) and never call. 

A lab which doesn't holler "QNS" 

A page that doesn't always end "Arrest." 

Attendings saying sensibly and well 

That really the ward doesn't look like hell. 

A place where each can do just as he will 

And win the battle of the pulse and pill. 

Proteus mirabilis 



87 



INTERNSHIP PLACEMENTS 



Ackley, Alexander McF., Jr. Medicine 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York, N.Y. 
Albanese, Helen G. Rotating 

Mountainside Hospital 

Montelair, NJ. 
Albanese, Richard A. Rotating 

Mountainside Hospital 

Montelair, NJ. 
Albright, Nile L. Surgery 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York, N.Y. 
Allison, Ronald C. Surgery 

Palo Alto-Stanford Hospital Center 

Palo Alto, Calif. 
Andrews, William B. Pediatrics 

Children's Medical Center 

University of Washington 

Seattle, Wash. 
Balch, Charles M. Surgery 

Duke Hospital 

Durham, N.C. 
Ballo, Joseph M. Pathology 

Boston City Hospital 

Mallory Institute of Pathology 

Boston, Mass. 
Banyard, Richard D. Rotating 

Greenwich Hospital 

Greenwich, Conn. 
Belcher, Jonathan K. Rotating 

San Diego County-University Hospital 

San Diego, Calif. 
Berger, Walter E., Ill Medicine 

H. C. Moffitt-University of 

California Hospitals 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Biles, James D., Ill Surgery 

Charity Hospital of Louisiana 

Tulane University Division 

New Orleans, La. 
Blabey, Robert G, Jr. Surgery 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York, N.Y. 
Bowen, John C, III Surgery 

University Hospitals of Cleveland 

Cleveland, Ohio 
Bragg, Franklin E., II Medicine 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York, N.Y. 
Brensilver, Howard L. Medicine 

New England Medical Center Hospitals 

Boston, Mass. 
Brewster, David C. Surgery 

Massachusetts General Hospital 

Boston, Mass. 
Briley, John M., Jr. Pediatrics 

Boston City Hospital 

Boston University Division 

Boston, Mass. 
Christensen, Roger P. Medicine 

University of Colorado Medical Center 

Denver, Colo. 
Christensen, Thomas B. Medicine 

King County Hospital 

Seattle, Wash. 
Clark, Preston R., Jr. Rotating 

Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital 

Hanover, N.H. 
Clark, Robert A. Medicine 

University of Washington Hospitals 

Seattle, Wash. 
Cohen, Bernard H. Medicine 

Emory University Hospital 

Atlanta, Ga. 
Cohen, Myles J. Surgery 

University of California Hospital 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
Curci, Michael R. Surgery 

Yale-New Haven Medical Center 

New Haven, Conn. 
DeAngelis, Roger T. Surgery 

St. Luke's Hospital 

New York, N.Y. 



Drew, Michael A. Surgery 

University of Colorado 

Medical Center 

Denver, Colo. 
Feibel, John H. Surgery 

Bronx Municipal Hospital Center 

New York, N.Y. 
Finkelstein, Fredric O. Medicine 

Bellevue Hospital Center 

Columbia 1st Medical Division 

New York, N.Y. 
Fleming, Thomas C. Rotating 

Bernalillo County-Indian Hospital 

University of New Mexico 

Albuquerque, N.M. 
Follows, John W., Jr. Rotating 

Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital 

Hanover, N.H. 
Frank, Richard Surgery 

Mount Sinai Hospital 

New York, N.Y. 
Fu, Karen K.-W. Rotating 

Montreal General Hospital 

Montreal, Quebec, Canada 
Gaines, John E. Medicine 

Bellevue Hospital Center 

Columbia 1st Medical Division 

New York, N.Y. 
Garnett, Daniel J. Surgery 

King County Hospital 

Seattle, Wash. 
Garrell, Stephen L. Medicine 

Cleveland Metropolitan 

General Hospital 

Cleveland, Ohio 
Gerber, Marcia G. Medicine 

State University-Kings County 

Medical Center 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 
German, Harold Rotating 

Lenox Hill Hospital 

New York, N.Y. 
Gise, Frederick M. Medicine 

Mount Sinai Hospital 

New York, N.Y. 
Gise, Leslie H. Medicine 

Mount Sinai Hospital 

New York, N.Y. 
Glen, Dulaney Medicine 

St. Luke's Hospital 

New York, N.Y. 
Greenberger, Robert A. Rotating 

Los Angeles County Harbor 

General Hospital 

Torrance, Calif. 
Grossman, Robert A. Medicine 

Hospital of the University of 

Pennsylvania 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Hamlin, Charles Surgery 

Roosevelt Hospital 

New York, N.Y. 
Heilbrunn, Ernst Rotating 

Montefiore Hospital and 

Medical Center 

New York, N.Y. 
Hodge, Charles J., Jr. Surgery 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York, N.Y. 
Holschuh, Frederick C. Rotating 

Queen's Hospital 

Honolulu, Hawaii 
Howland, John S. Rotating 

Mary Fletcher Hospital 

Burlington, Vt. 
Hurd, Richard A., Jr. Surgery 

Emory University Hospital 

Atlanta, Ga. 
Imbembo, Anthony L. Surgery 

Massachusetts General Hospital 

Boston, Mass. 
Johnson, William G. Medicine 

New York Hospital 

New York, N.Y. 



Johnston, Bruce C. Medicine 

St. Luke's Hospital 

New York, N.Y. 
Jones, R. DeWitt S. Rotating 

Queen's Hospital 

Honolulu, Hawaii 
Jones, T. Stephen, Jr. Medicine 

Palo Alto-Stanford Hospital Center 

Palo Alto, Calif. 
Kaiser, Carol A. Medicine 

Bellevue Hospital Center 

Columbia 1st Medical Division 

New York, N.Y. 
Killebrew, Kate Medicine 

University of Washington Hospitals 

Seattle, Wash. 
Kirschberg, Gordon J. Rotating 

Royal Victoria Hospital 

Montreal, Quebec, Canada 
Knapp, Robert V. Rotating 

San Diego County-University Hospital 

San Diego, Calif. 
Kolman, Benet S. Medicine 

University of Virginia Hospital 

Charlottesville, Va. 
Kuster, Gordon I. Medicine 

Bellevue Hospital Center 

Columbia 1st Medical Division 

New York, N.Y. 
Lee, William M. Medicine 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York, N.Y. 
Levy, Nelson L. Surgery 

University of Colorado 

Medical Center 

Denver, Colo. 
MacFarland, Joseph A. Medicine 

University Hospital 

Ann Arbor, Michigan 
Mackler, Richard J. Medicine 

Bronx Municipal Hospital Center 

New York, N.Y. 
McKane, Douglas D. Surgery 

St. Luke's Hospital 

New York, N.Y. 
McNamara, Thomas E. Surgery 

St. Vincent's Hospital 

New York, N.Y. 
Merwin, Grier H. Surgery 

University of Chicago Hospitals 

and Clinics 

Chicago, 111. 
Milic, Ann B. Fellowship in Ob-Gyn at 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York, N.Y. 
Miller, Edward J. Medicine 

Buffalo General Hospital 

Buffalo, N.Y. 
Morgan, Alexander C. Medicine 

Cambridge City Hospital 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Myers, Robert P. Medicine 

Vanderbilt University Hospital 

Nashville, Tenn. 
Nakano, Kenneth K. Rotating 

Queen's Hospital 

Honolulu, Hawaii 
Noel, Gordon L. Medicine 

University of Chicago Hospitals 
and Clinics 
Chicago, 111. 
Novak, Stanley F. Pediatrics 
Strong Memorial Hospital of the 
University of Rochester 
Rochester, N.Y. 
Novalis, George S. Rotating 
Greenwich Hospital 
Greenwich, Conn. 
Olcott. Cornelius, IV Surgery 
H. C. Moffitt-University of 
California Hospitals 
San Francisco, Calif. 
Olds, David D. Medicine 
St. Luke's Hospital 
New York, N.Y. 



Penner, Daniel B. Medicine 

State University of New York 

Upstate Medical Center 

Syracuse, N.Y. 
Perry, Samuel \\\, III Rotating 

Bronx Municipal Hospital Center 

New York, N.Y. 
Petito, Frank A., Jr. Medicine 

New York Hospital 

New York, N.Y. 
Pieri, Carolyn M. Pediatrics 

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Pollack, Arthur C. Surgery 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York, N.Y. 
Raabe, Daniel S., Jr. Medicine 

University Hospital 

Ann Arbor, Michigan 
Rodvien, Robert Medicine 

New England Medical Center Hospitals 

Boston, Mass. 
Rohrlich, Jay B. Medicine 

Long Island College Hospital 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Rosefsky, Quinn B. Medicine 

Health Center Hospitals of the 

University of Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Rosen, Marvin Pediatrics 

Bronx Municipal Hospital Center 

New York, N.Y. 
Rosenblum, Gerald S. Medicine 

Presbyterian -St. Luke's Hospital 

Chicago, 111. 
Russell, Robert M. Medicine 

University of Chicago Hospitals 

and Clinics 

Chicago, III. 
Scheinhorn, David J. Medicine 

University Hospital 

Ann Arbor, Michigan 



Schmidt, Paula A. Pediatrics 

New England Medical Center Hospitals 

Boston, Mass. 
Schneider, Richard P. Medicine 

Grady Memorial Hospital 

Atlanta, Ga. 
Schneier, Harvey A. Medicine 

North Carolina Memorial Hospital 

Chape] Hill, N.C. 
Sellner, Henry A. Medicine 

University Hospitals of Cleveland 

Cleveland, Ohio 
Sherman, Stanley Surgery 

St. Vincent's Hospital 

New York, N.Y. 
Shukovsky, Leonard J. Rotating 

lefl'erson Medical College Hospital 

"Philadelphia, Pa. 
Silverstein, Fred E. Rotating 

King County Hospital 

Seattle, Wash. 
Sloane, Robert E. Surgery 

Massachusetts General Hospital 

Boston, Mass. 
Spier, Roger D. Surgery 

Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital 

Cooperstown, N.Y. 
Srinivasan, Balachandran D. Rotating 

Queen's Hospital 

Honolulu, Hawaii 
Srodes, Charles H. Medicine 

Duke Hospital 

Durham, N.C. 
Stein, Sherman C. Rotating 

Pennsylvania Hospital 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Stookey, Robert A. Ob-Gyn 

Strong Memorial Hospital of the 

University of Rochester 

Rochester, N.Y. 



Sweeney, James G. Surgery 

Charity Hospital of Louisiana 

Tulane L'niversity Division 

New Orleans, La. 
Tavernetti, Richard R. Surgery 

Los Angeles County Harbor 

General Hospital 

Torrance, Calif. 
Tillisch, Jan H. Medicine 

University of California Hospital 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
Tracht, Diane G. Rotating 

St. Vincent's Hospital 

New York, N.Y. 
Violin, George A. Medicine 

Mount Sinai Hospital 

New York, N.Y. 
Waskell, Lucy A. Rotating 

San Francisco General Hospital 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Wenglin, Barry D. Medicine 

University of Kansas Medical Center 

Kansas City, Kansas 
Wilson, James R. Rotating 

Greenwich Hospital 

Greenwich, Conn. 
Winickoff, Richard N. Medicine 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York, N.Y. 
Winner, Samuel D. Surgery 

St. Luke's Hospital 

New York, N.Y. 
Winslow, Richard L. Medicine 

Bellevue Hospital Center 

Columbia 1st Medical Division 

New York, N.Y. 
Wiseley, Sally F. Rotating 

University of Kentucky Medical Center 

Lexington, Ky. 
Wohlauer, Peter F. Rotating 

Greenwich Hospital 

Greenwich, Conn. 



SUMMARY OF SPECIALTIES 



SUMMARY OF UNDERGRADUATE COLLEGES 



Medicine — 48 
Surgery — 30 
Pediatrics — 7 
Psychiatry — 7 
Orthopedics — 5 
Ob-Gyn - 4 
Ophthalmology — 



Neurology — 3 
Radiology — 3 
Urology — 2 
Dermatology — 1 
Neurosurgery — 1 
Pathology — 1 
Total - 116 



SUMMARY OF INTERNSHIPS 



Medicine — 49 
Surgery — 30 
Rotating - 28 



Pediatrics — 6 
Ob-Gyn - 1 
Pathology — 1 



Adelphi — 1 
Alfred - 1 
Amherst — 4 
Bard - 1 
Barnard — 1 
Bates - 1 
Bowdoin — 1 
Bryn Mawr — 2 
California — 1 
CCNY - 2 
Colgate — 1 
Columbia — 14 
Cornell - 2 
Dartmouth — 2 
Davidson — 1 
Duke - 1 
Emory — 2 
Grinnell — 2 
Hamilton — 2 
Harvard — 11 
Hobart - 2 
Johns Hopkins — 1 
Kenyon — 1 
Lafayette — 1 



Manhattan — 3 
MIT - 1 
McGill - 1 
NYU - 1 
Oberlin - 1 
Pennsylvania — 2 
Penn State — 1 
Pomona — 1 
Princeton — 15 
Radcliffe - 1 
Rensselaer — 1 
Rutgers — 1 
Stanford — 1 
Swarthmore — 1 
Syracuse — 1 
Toledo — 1 
Trinity — 1 
Tufts - 1 
Vassar — 1 
Wesleyan — 2 
Wilkes - 1 
Williams — 1 
Yale - 16 
Total - 116 



89 



The P & S Club 



Seventy-three years ago the P&S Club had its 
inception at the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons. The fact that its founder, John R. Mott, 
was later awarded the Nobel Peace Prize may 
well have presaged a distinguished history for 
the most enduring of student organizations in the 
annals of American medical colleges. 

Mott, who was then the National Student 
Secretary for the YMCA, named the organization 
The Young Men's Christian Association at the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons. The 1910 
annual report shows that the name had become 
the P&S Association by that year, and Dr. Ralph 
Soekman who was the Executive Secretary in 
1911-12 tells us that the P&S Club had adopted 
its permanent name by his first year of service. 

The Club's early activities revolved around a 
house on 57th Street which was purchased with 
contributed funds. It contained a library, a 
student eating club, meeting rooms, and up- 
stairs accommodations where sixteen students 
roomed. Early reports tell of guest speaker pro- 
grams, discussion groups, Bible study, a student 
band, and student projects such as free medical 
examinations for Boy Scouts and a rooming 
advisory service which found "good" rooms for 
new students. 

The P&S Club was to outgrow its quarters 
two times in its earlier years, and achieve some 
of its best known services before coming to 
Washington Heights. Notable among these was 
the raising of funds to purchase a steam launch 
in 1917. The craft was delivered in the spring 
and used for picnics on the Hudson, but in May 
it was loaded aboard an ocean steamer bound 
for Labrador. With it went two fourth year 
P&S Club members who delivered the launch to 
the famed Labrador physician, Sir William Gren- 
fell. The boat was used by the Grenfell mission 
to take medical services to the Eskimo and 
Indian fishermen on isolated islands along the 
Labrador coast. In succeeding summers other 
P&S seniors returned to man the P&S Club 
launch in its missions of mercy along the Labra- 
dor coast. 

Today the P&S Club ranks as the most active 
and comprehensive student activity organiza- 
tion in American medical education. Relieved 




EDWIN M. BARTON 

Director of Student Activities 



of the responsibility of building services by the 
existence of Bard Hall as a residence and student 
activity center, the P&S Club directs itself to 
the fostering of an extra-curricular program that 
helps make the years of undergraduate medical 
school a period of personal growth and enjoy- 
ment. It is student led and faculty advised, with 
the major part of its administrative work load 
borne by its staff of director and office secretary. 
Last year almost three hundred scheduled events 
were held, with just under fifteen thousand 
attendants and participants, not including ath- 
letic contests. Some of its projects are routine, 
a few are courageous— but its overall goal is to 
keep its members attuned to worthy goals of 
service and wholesome development of the 
highest order. 

Edwin M. Barton 



91 



CPMC Builds 



i Emm c 





William Black Medical 
Research Building & 
Alumni Auditorium 




Below, left, and right— Doctor's Office Building 
with artist's conception of completed appearance. 



<S ?>" fi£' jw 



it s*f ' 







3^^ 










KtjS 4 


g|J 




j^B? 


V 



rHE PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

BIES HOSPITAL ADDITION 

A MAJOR PROJECT 
IMBIA PRESBYTERIAN MEDICAL CENTER 
DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM ' 

I aOCOSHTUl i 




Above-Babies Hospital Addition 








333 

Pi 




--, l- -H: 




Notes on the History of the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
on the Occasion of its Bicentennial 



The College of Physicians and Surgeons traces 
its origins to prerevolutionary times and the 
story of its founding is closely tied to the con- 
temporary medical education in colonial New 
York. In the mid-eighteenth century the colonies 
had no medical schools. A lad desiring to become 
a physician could apprentice himself to an estab- 
lished practitioner at as early an age as fifteen. 
During an apprenticeship lasting from two to 
seven years he would be taught to prepare pre- 
scriptions, to bleed and cup, and gradually be 
led into active participation in the care of 
patients. Yet the number of skilled practitioners 
did not match the need for their services. As 
one colonial historian wrote: "few physicians 
amongst us are eminent for their skill. Quacks 
abound like the locusts in Egypt." Yet among 
these few were a number of excellent physicians, 
eminent both in their skill and their training. 
For many American physicians had spent years 
studying at the great European centers of med- 
ical learning such as Edinburgh, London, and 
Leyden. 

It was among this group of men that the need 
for a colonial medical school was clearly realized. 
Shortly after the founding of King's College in 
New York in 1754 efforts were made to start a 
medical school in conjunction with it. The Gov- 
ernors of the College were reluctant to act, 
however, and it was only in 1767 that the King's 
College Medical School, the forerunner of P&S, 
was founded, the first medical school in New 
York and the second in America. 

The faculty were among the outstanding 
colonial practitioners of medicine and surgery. 
Samuel Bard, who had graduated from Edin- 
burgh with highest honors, was professor of the 
Theory and Practice of Physick. He was later 
to become president of P&S. John Jones, also a 
graduate of Edinburgh who had studied as 
well in London and Paris, was Professor of 
Surgery. He wrote early works on military 
surgery, performed the first lithotomy in New 
York City, and cared for Benjamin Franklin and 
George Washington. Samuel Clossy, a graduate 
of Trinity College in Dublin, was Professor of 
Anatomy. He had lectured in anatomy since 1763 
at King's College in New York and was among 
the few practitioners of his time to have had 
extensive experience in clinico-pathological cor- 



relation. Peter Middleton, a graduate of St. 
Andrews in Scotland, was professor of Path- 
ology and Physiology. In 1750 he had injected 
the blood vessels and performed the first anat- 
omic dissections for medical instruction in the 
colonies. James Smith, a graduate of Leyden, 
was Professor of Chemistry and Materia Medica. 
John Tennent, who had studied at Princeton 
and taken his medical degree at Edinburgh, held 
the Professorship of Midwifery, the first such 
chair in this country. The professors received 
no salary, but were paid fees by the students 
attending their courses. 

Admission requirements, course of study, and 
examinations were closely modelled after those 
of the European universities. For admission a 
student needed either a Bachelor of Arts degree 
or proof by examination of complete knowledge 
of Latin and of certain branches of Natural 
Philosophy. The course of study for the bache- 
lor's degree in medicine was two years for those 

The College of Physicians and Surgeons at 18 
Robinson Street, New York City (1808) 










~ 



... 



who had previously been apprenticed to a 
reputable physician, or three years otherwise. 
The M.D. degree was obtainable after one fur- 
ther year provided the student had faithfully 
attended two courses under each professor, pub- 
licly defended a medical thesis, and attained 
the age of 22 years. Three students were ad- 
mitted in the first year of the medical school, 
1767, and in 1769 the Bachelor of Medicine 
degree was conferred on two students, Robert 
Tucker and Samuel Kissam. The following year 
Tucker was granted the M.D. degree, the first 
doctorate of medicine to be conferred in this 
country. Thus King's College Medical School 
was from its inception, as Dr. Byron Stookey 
points out, "a medical school in the full sense 
of that term. The Medical School of the College 
of Philadelphia (later University of Pennsyl- 
vania), though it opened its doors two years 
earlier, could boast a faculty of only two young 
men, both recent graduates with little clinical 
experience; it made no requirements for admis- 
sion and its curriculum fell far short of the 
medical educational standards of the day." 

From 1770 to the outbreak of hostilities in 
1776 a total of twelve M.D. degrees were con- 
ferred by the medical school of King's College. 
The Revolution of 1776 or the Rebellion as some 
preferred to call it, was a disaster for the col- 
lege. This was due in part to the Loyalist 
sympathies of some of the faculty and in part 
to the British occupation of New York City. In 
any event, faculty and students scattered to serve 
on the side of their choice. 

The year 1784 saw revival of the medical 
school and a change in the name from King's 
College to Columbia College. The reconstituted 
faculty consisted of five professors, Samuel Bard, 
now Professor of Chemistry, being the only 
member of the original teaching staff of 1767. 
The school prospered for some years, but soon 
insufficient funds and reorganizational difficul- 
ties caused a period of decline. It was during 
this period that the New York County Medical 
Society was organized and a charter obtained 
in 1807 incorporating the Society as a College 
of Physicians and Surgeons. The College was a 
success from the start under the presidency of 
Nicholas Romayne, the first American to be 
honored by election to the Royal College of 
Physicians of Edinburgh. Fifty-three students 
matriculated at P&S in its first year, 76 in 1808, 
and 82 in 1809. Eight students received degrees 
at its first commencement in 1811. The annual 
session was four months in duration. Lectures 
were given in a house on Robinson Street (now 
Park Place ) and clinical instruction was carried 
out at the New York Hospital and the Alms- 




■ of Physicians and Surgeonsat 3 Barclay St 
(1813-1837) 



house (now Bellevue). Meanwhile medical in- 
struction at Columbia College was suspended 
and in 1813 the medical faculty of Columbia 
merged with P&S. 

Among the most outstanding of the P&S 
faculty of those years was Valentine Mott, the 
greatest American surgeon of his time. He made 
it a rule never to operate unless he would choose 
the operation for himself were he the patient. 
He is the first on record to ligate successfully 
the innominate and common carotid arteries ( for 
aneurysm) and he repaired harelip deformities 
with remarkable success. The Valentine Mott 
Professorship of Surgery was established at P&S 
in 1931 in his honor. 

By the early part of the nineteenth century 
New York City's population had grown to 80,000. 
And by 1837 when P&S moved from its location 
at 3 Barclay Street to 67 Crosby Street enroll- 
ment had passed 200. A new method of select- 
ing professors was established whereby they 
were "tried out" as lecturers for one session be- 
fore appointment. Another advance in medical 
education was the establishment by Willard 
Parker in 1841 of the College Clinic where out- 
patients were brought to the college for exami- 
nation and treatment in front of the classes. 
Parker, a Professor of Surgery, also became the 
first to incise and drain an abscessed appendix 
in 1843. 

In 1860 P&S officially became a part of Colum- 
bia College with which it had long been asso- 
ciated, and in 1S91 the union was legalized when 
Columbia became a university. The alumni of 
the college first joined together in 1859 forming 



96 






fegi Building on Fourth Avenue and 23rd Street 
1856-1887) 



the Alumni Association. The Association was 
incorporated in 1S73 as a group to promote "the 
interests of P&S in the work of medical educa- 
tion and the cultivation of social intercourse 
among the alumni." In that same year funds 
were raised to establish a professorial chair and 
build laboratories. During these years the college 
term was lengthened to seven months. 

In 18S4 William H. Vanderbilt gave P&S the 
largest gift ever made to an American medical 
school, observing that "the health, comfort, and 
lives of the whole community are so dependent 
upon skilled physicians that no profession re- 
quires more care in the preparation of its prac- 
titioners." P&S soon moved from its Fourth 
Avenue and 23rd Street location to its new land 
on 59th and 60th Streets between Ninth and 
Tenth Avenue, and two years later Vanderbilt's 
four sons made possible the building of the 
Vanderbilt Clinic for outpatients. By 1901 Van- 
derbilt Clinic was treating 42,000 patients an- 
nually. 

In 1SSS the academic term was lengthened 
to eight months and graduation theses were 
abolished. The student body had grown enor- 
mouslv; by 1876 there were some 500 students, 
by 1886 more than 600, and by 1887, 809. How- 
ever, admissions standards were raised in 1903 
so that enrollment had dropped to 550 in 1904 
and 428 in 1905. It has remained at about that 
level ever since. An important innovation in 
instruction of this period was the institution of 
two month clinical clerkships for fourth year 
students at various hospitals around the city. 
1917 was an important year for it saw admission 



of women to the faculty and student body for 
the first time. 

It had long been apparent that the college 
required a large modern hospital for effective 
instruction in clinical medicine. First steps were 
taken in this direction by Dean Samuel Lambert 
in 1910 when he instituted a close alliance be- 
tween P&S and Presbyterian Hospital. But it 
remained for his successor, Dean William Dar- 
rach to lay plans and raise funds for the Colum- 
bia Presbyterian Medical Center which has 
become the most recent home of the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons. The Medical Center 
opened its doors officially in 1927. The Pres- 
byterian Hospital, the College, Sloane Hospital, 
Vanderbilt Clinic, Babies Hospital, Harkness 
Pavillion, the Neurological Institute, and the 
Psychiatric Institute were completed on land 
which was the gift of Edward S. Harkness. Two 
years later Harkness gave the college a medical 
residence which was named Bard Hall after 
Samuel Bard, the second president of P&S. 

The College of Physicians and Surgeons has 
made much progress as a part of the Medical 
Center. Among the many P&S contributions to 
healing the sick and advancing medical knowl- 
edge have been Dr. Robert F. Loeb's work on 
Addison's disease, Dr. Michael Heidelberger's 
work with the organisms of pneumonia, Dr. 
Frederick Gay's research on leprosy, the intro- 
duction of radioisotopes in the study of inter- 
mediary metabolism, the development of quan- 
titative immunochemistry, the first clinical use 
of vitamin B-12, the discovery of bacitracin, 
the development of the portacaval shunt in the 
treatment of cirrhosis, the chemical recognition 
of pheochromocytoma, and the first successful 
resection of the head of the pancreas for car- 
cinoma. Improvements in the teaching of medi- 
cine continue to be made, such as the institution 
in 1946 of the Group Clinic for outpatients as a 
part of the fourth year teaching program. 

As P&S looks back on 200 years of successful 
teaching of medicine, there are no signs of 
slowing down. In fact, P&S now finds itself in 
the midst of its greatest building program since 
the construction of the Medical Center. Those 
of us who leave now to become Doctors of 
Medicine can remain confident that P&S will 
continue to be, as it has been for 200 years, a 
strong and respected institution for the effective 
instruction of young men and women in the art 
and science of clinical medicine. 

William G Johnson 



97 



Art Show 




ART 
FESTIVAL 




Club 



ART 
FESTIVAL 

WiNTiNt-a 

SCULPTURI 

m art fgwi 

EXPLORE mm TALENTS 

Entry form available 

C-OUTtST Cl£>SES [Wl i 1 







Screen in Silhouette 

by 

Robert Myers 




THREE PENNY OPERA 




99 




100 




101 



A Short History of Bellevue Hospital 



"It is fortunate, gentlemen, that here at the Bellevue 
and Almshouse Establishments you will never lack of 
cases of every form and type of disorder, . . . New York 
is not only the city of excess in taxation, but she is 
the place of the ample provision for the acquisition of 
knowledge in almost every department of human pur- 
suit." (John Wakefield Francis, Consulting Physician, 
Bellevue Hospital, 1847-1861). 

Bellevue is the third oldest hospital in the United 
States; it is also the home of the oldest and one of the 
most illustrious medical traditions in this country. In 
its now ancient buildings have trained students and 
house staffs for 160 years. And for 230 years an extra- 
ordinary succession of great medical practitioners, 
teachers, and scientists has worked within its wards and 
laboratories. 

A hospital to care for the destitute ill was estab- 
lished as early as 1658 in Dutch Colonial New Amster- 
dam, but the new colony quickly outgrew it, and a 
series of odd buildings was subsequently used. It was 
not until 1734 that the settlement, then under British 
control, finally provided an infirmary — a decision which 
was necessitated by an epidemic of smallpox which laid 
terrible waste to the 8600 people then living on the 
southern tip of Manhattan. In 1736 the six bed hospital 
which ultimately became Bellevue was opened in a 
second floor room of the new Publick Workhouse and 
House of Correction, under the direction of its first 
visiting physician, Dr. John van Beuran. 

Medicine in colonial New York was largely a hap- 
hazard affair. There were neither professional nor royal 
restrictions on practice, and chirurgeons, barber-sur- 
geons, bone setters, charlatans, and quacks were free 
to treat illness according to their own bias. In the 
colony itself water was drawn from wells lying beside 
the open sewers that ran among the houses carrying 
every form of waste to the rivers. Pigs rooted in the 
mud of Broadway. Epidemics of smallpox, typhus, 
cholera, and yellow fever seemed to begin with every 
new boatload of arrivals from Europe or the Indies and 
spread without hindrance among the tiny houses 
crowded along the waterfront. 

The little infirmary in the workhouse was quickly 
overfilled with as many as 300 patients and the grounds 
around it — now the site of New York's City Hall — filled 
with additions and outbuildings. Following the Revolu- 
tion the number of poor in the city increased enor- 
mously and among them the repeated storms of yellow 
fever which struck the city in the 1790's were par- 
ticularly fatal. In 1794 it was decided to isolate the 
victims of the epidemic from the rest of the population 
by extending the facilities of the hospital to a large 
farm at Kips Bay on the East River, a place known 
as Belle View. 

By 1S12 the need for a larger hospital to replace 
the original infirmary and fever hospital at Belle View 
was finally recognized and in 1816 the new Bellevue 
was opened adjacent to the latter. The Bellevue Estab- 
lishment, as it was called, was not only a hospital, but 
a jail, an almshouse, and a school for the poor as well. 
Within the buildings which stood until the beginning of 
this century the hospital services gradually replaced 
the others. It was at about this time that the new Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons and the older Columbia 
(formerly King's College) Medical School merged. One 
of the first professors of the combined schools was Dr. 
David Hosack. Visiting physician at Bellevue, daring 
surgeon, outstanding physician of such citizens as Aaron 
Burr and Alexander Hamilton, botanist of international 
standing, Hosack was probably the greatest practitioner 
in early 19th century New York. 

Among Hosack's associates at P&S and Bellevue were 
John Wakefield Francis (the first graduate of the Col- 
lege, in 1811) and Valentine Mott (who took his M.D. 
at Columbia in 1806). Francis and Mott initiated clini- 
cal lectures at Bellevue in 1849, the beginning of large- 
scale public medical education in the institution. The 
events which led up to this are revealing of a pattern 
which has recurred many times at Bellevue: gradual 



102 



disorganization resulting from political mismanagement 
and medical neglect, terminated and reversed with the 
emergence of a strong willed, dynamic medical leader. 
In this instance the disorganization increased between 
1832 and 1847 as a result of the political corruption of 
the City Council known then as the "Forty Thieves", 
plundering by the hospital stewards, and several catas- 
trophic epidemics of cholera and typhus. And the leader 
who appeared to force a repair of these conditions was 
Jimmy Wood, a 35 year old surgeon who established a 
despotism at the hospital, fought City Hall on its own 
harsh terms, and founded Bellevue's tradition as a 
teaching hospital. He created a Board of visiting physi- 
cians and surgeons from the best practitioners and 
teachers in New York — such men as Mott, Francis, 
Alonzo Clark, the obstetrician, and Willard Parker, the 
surgeon. He had an amphitheatre built to accommodate 
the clinical teaching program and opened Bellevue to 
all students of medicine; he replaced the political ap- 
pointment of interns by a system of competitive exami- 
nations which drew such young doctors as William 
Henry Welch, William Stewart Halsted, and William 
Crawford Gorgas who conquered yellow fever and 
malaria in Panama. As effective a surgeon as an admin- 
istrator, Jimmy Wood once resected an entire mandible 
leaving behind the periosteum from which a new bone 
regenerated within a few weeks. He devised his own 
treatment of tic douloureux by removing the trigeminal 
ganglion. He pushed through the state legislature the 
first law to legalize the dissection of unclaimed bodies. 
He was one of the founders of the Bellevue Medical 
College, which later became New York University 
School of Medicine. 

What Jimmy Wood was to the evolution of Bellevue 
as a world famed teaching hospital, his contemporary 
Dr. Stephen Smith was to the emergence of an aware- 
ness of public health and sanitation in New York City. 
Dr. Smith interned at Bellevue under Wood and for two 
years he directed the typhus hospital on Blackwell's 
(now Welfare) Island. He formed the Sanitary Associa- 
tion and with the help of Peter Cooper, John Jacob 
Astor, and other leading citizens he launched an attack 
on City Hall and the Tweed Ring to improve the city's 
streets, sewers, water supply, and tenements. By 1866 
he had pushed through New York's first Metropolitan 
Health Law and was appointed the city's first health 
commissioner; he had the politically appointed health 
inspectors (one of whom defined hygiene as "the vapor 
which rises from stagnant water") replaced with trained 
workers, he ripped out filthy public markets by moon- 
light when their scoffing owners were drunk or asleep, 
he pressed for mass smallpox vaccination, and he placed 
the Blackwell's Island epidemic hospital under the care 
of the Sisters of Charity, replacing the "ten-day drunks." 
These were women who were serving jail terms for bad 
conduct of one sort or another — rarely very charitable 
to the ill and never trained — who until that time had 
provided most of the nursing care at Bellevue and on 
the island. Though Commissioner of Health until 1875, 
Smith still carried a full time teaching and operating 
schedule at Bellevue and was a pioneer in the aseptic 
surgical technique of Lister. Beyond this he helped to 
organize Roosevelt and Johns Hopkins hospitals. 

With the passing of the Civil War one more innova- 
tion appeared at Bellevue. Dr. Edward Dalton, just re- 
turned from the war, introduced the first ambulance 
service in the world with two sombre black carriages 
each with its own driver, surgeon, and supply of medi- 
cal equipment. The post-war period saw the organiza- 
tion of Bellevue into four medical and three surgical 
services for indwelling patients, and the formation of 
the first outpatient service in America, the Bureau of 
Medical and Surgical Relief for the Outdoor Poor. As 
part of the outpatient department the children's clinic 
was formed by Stephen Smith's brother. Dr. J. Lewis 
Smith, and Dr. Abraham Jacobi who together originated 
the specialty of pediatrics in the Unitecf States with this 
clinic. Two other great medical figures at Bellevue in 
the lS60's were Dr. Lewis Sayre, founder of orthopedic 
surgery at Bellevue, whose operative and mechanical 




Operating amphitheatre at Bellevue, about 1S85. 

innovations were legendary, and Dr. Edward Janeway. 
The latter was a pathologist, anatomist, and physician 
of the first order. Alert and intense, he brought back 
from his European studies a conviction that most of the 
drugs then in use were useless or actually harmful, and 
in his time most of them did drop from common use. 
Though his practice was immense he charged the rich 
and the poor the same small fees and frequently, to 
Mrs. Janeway's domestic distress, failed to charge any- 
thing at all. "The condition of my patients is of first 
importance. The condition of my pocketbook is as God 
wills it," he told his students. 

The closing years of the 19th century were extra- 
ordinary ones for Bellevue for although the buildings 
were in great need of repair and enlargement, and in 
spite of the chronic shortage of money, the talent that 
had accumulated under Jimmy Wood's guidance had 
begun to flower. This was the age of microbiology, of 
pathology, and of surgery under anesthesia. At Bellevue 
it was the age of Welch, of Biggs, and of Halsted. 
William Henry Welch was a graduate of Yale College 
and P&S and in 1876 he became an intern at Bellevue. 
There he met the pathologist Francis Delafield and 
formed an interest in pathology. Subsequently he spent 
two years in Europe studying pathology and bacteriology 
before returning to Bellevue where he set up the first 
laboratory course in pathology in an American medical 
school in a few tiny rooms beneath a stairway. When 
Koch discovered the tubercle bacillus in Europe, Welch 
was soon demonstrating it to his students and colleagues 
at Bellevue. His success as a demonstrator in anatomy 
and pathology led to the Chair of Pathological Anatomy 
at Bellevue Medical School — and a similar offer from 
P&S, but no salary! Welch who had been desperately 
poor during all of his years at Bellevue and had had to 
teach cram courses on the side in order to live, could 
no longer endure the political complications and lack of 
freedom to pursue research at Bellevue and in 1885 he 
accepted the chair of pathology at Johns Hopkins 
where he gathered about him a faculty of young men 
who were soon to be famous: Osier, Cushing, Council- 
man, Halsted, Kelly. 

Halsted, like Welch, was trained at P&S and Belle- 
vue. During his early surgical career at Bellevue he 
grew to have a reputation as an aloof, austere perfec- 
tionist, a surgeon who labored hours over the simplest 
operations, whose techniques became standards of sur- 
gical excellence. When Halsted was appointed visiting 
surgeon at Bellevue in 1883 he refused to operate in 
the antiquated surgical amphitheatre and asked the City 
to provide him with a new operating room. Failing at 
this, he installed a great outdoor tent, well ventilated 
and lighted at a personal expense of $10,000: he was not 
a man who gave in to obstruction easily. Halsted's in- 
terest in cocaine as a local anesthetic, which he was 
the first in America to use, was very nearly his undoing 
for through his experimentation on himself with the drug 
he discovered its addicting properties. His phenomenal 
surgical prowess and his self confidence rapidly dwind- 
led; he suffered several breakdowns and had to leave 
the city. Finally, a shattered, stooped, shy man, he was 
asked by Welch, an old friend, to join the faculty at 
Johns Hopkins. It was Welch's humanity and compassion 
that saved Halsted, for though he never escaped his 



addiction entirely, his genius, skill, and confidence 
gradually returned. 

One of Welch's most influential students in the little 
classroom beneath the stairs in the old Bellevue was 
Herman Biggs, the man who proved spitting unsanitary 
as well as impolite. In 1885, when Welch left for Johns 
Hopkins, Biggs took over his laboratory and soon be- 
came chief of the new Carnegie Laboratory, the first 
laboratory for research in pathology to be built in 
America. During this period when epidemics of cholera 
were assailing the world. Biggs proved by culture sus- 
pected cases arriving by ship from Europe, preventing 
spread of the disease through the city. Shortly after- 
wards a quarantine station was established by the City 
Health Department at Biggs' instigation. In 1889 Biggs 
and H. P. Loomis at Bellevue and T. Mitchell Prudden 
at P&S wrote a report which concluded that tuberculosis 
was a preventable, acquired disease — contrary to the 
suppositions of the medical profession — spread by in- 
halation of sputum droplets and ingested with milk and 
meat; this was the beginning of a long campaign of 
public education, sanitation and isolation of cases which 
Biggs carried on throughout his life. The culmination of 
this effort came in 1906 when Biggs and Prudden con- 
vinced the health department to make reporting of cases 
of tuberculosis compulsory. Biggs' other major accom- 
plishment in the field of public health was the diagnosis 
of diphtheria by culture and the development of an anti- 
toxin successful against established cases of diphtheria. 
With the beginning of the 20th century came another 
of the periodic upheavals at Bellevue. The hospital was 
desperately overcrowded and the buildings were over 85 
years old. The plumbing leaked, electric wires — a late 
19th century afterthought — were draped randomly be- 
tween buildings, rumors were daily spawned in the city 
about the misery and brutality of the insane pavillion. 
Forty-three interns were packed into sixteen rooms. The 
conditions in the prison ward were execrable. At long 
last Bellevue's administration was removed from the 
Department of Charities and Correction and given to an 
independent board of trustees whose report on the con- 
ditions at Bellevue had one immediate result: funds were 
provided for a new Bellevue. Dr. Alexander Lambert 
was the new medical chief and his staff included Drs. 
Austin Flint, Francis Delafield, Edward Janeway, and 
Abraham Jacobi; the surgeons were Drs. Frederick 
Dennis and George Stewart. A psychologist and neurolo- 
gist were appointed to each division. It was at this 
time, too, that the Bellevue Nursing School — the first 
training school for nurses in America, inspired by 
Florence Nightingale — was made a part of New York 
University. 

One of the young members of Dr. Lambert's staff in 
1903 was a P&S graduate named James Alexander 
Miller. Inspired by Biggs he developed a deep interest 
in Bellevue's tuberculosis patients; at a time when 
10,000 people a year were dying of the disease he 
organized the formerly neglected tuberculosis patients 
into an independent service under Columbia's auspices, 
had all tuberculosis patients transferred to the service, 
founded an outpatient clinic, had an old ferryboat 
moored in the East River beside Bellevue to provide a 
fresh air day camp, and from some source provided his 
patients with an adequate diet. At first Miller virtually 
had to beg for funds to pay for these innovations, but in 
1926 he obtained the support of Mayor Jimmy Walker, 
whose brother he had treated for TB, and for the first 
time the tuberculosis service received money from the 
city budget. When in 1938 the chest service got its own 
modern building, it had become a world center in tuber- 
culosis research and teaching, a status which it has 
held to this day. 

In 1912 Dr. Lambert set up one of the country's first 
electrocardiographs at Bellevue and in 1914 he estab- 
lished in the outpatient department a cardiac clinic, a 
prototype of many similar clinics formed around the 
country. In 1909 a young Bellevue clinician named 
Warren Coleman revolutionized the treatment of typhoid 
fever by feeding rather than starving his patients; he 
demonstrated that the starvation and not the fever ac- 
counted for a large proportion of those dying from the 
disease. More important his experiment raised questions 
about the role of metabolism in disease. Within a few 
years the great Cornell physiologist Graham Lusk, Dr. 
Eugene F. DuBois, a pathologist at Presbyterian Hos- 
pital, and Dr. Coleman had joined together in a labora- 
tory adjacent to a Bellevue ward and were experiment- 



103 



ing with their "respiration calorimeter" — now preserved 
at the Smithsonian Institute. Here in the first metabol- 
ism service in America they precisely measured carbon 
dioxide, water, and oxygen exchange and body tempera- 






.IS 



- -j- ~ ■■ ■ 




Bellevue Hospital in 1879. 



ture in all forms of illness in the large sealed box of the 
calorimeter. They defined the concepts of "high" and 
"low" metabolism and the relation of thyroid activity to 
these states. Perhaps a more important product of the 
laboratory was its human one; many of America's great- 
est researchers — among them Peters of Yale, Peabody, 
Aub, and Weiss of Harvard, and Barr and Richardson 
of New York — were schooled in the science of metabol- 
ism by DuBois, whose intellectual vitality, accuracy, and 
integrity set an inspiring standard. 

Perhaps the most exciting place in the Bellevue of 
the 30's was Dr. Miller's Columbia Chest Service. Here 
Dr. Andre Cournand, a young Frenchman who had come 
to complete his training in Dr. Millers clinic, met Dr. 
Dickinson Richards, then doing research in cardiac and 
pulmonary disease at P&S. Over the next ten years 
Richards and Cournand developed techniques of measur- 
ing cardiac output and cardiopulmonary function using 
the method of cardiac catheterization discovered in 1929 
by Forssmann in Germany — work for which the three 
were awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine and Physi- 
ology in 1956. Extending this work with the collabora- 
tion of Dr. Eleanor Baldwin at Presbyterian Hospital, 
they contributed much valuable information on the 
nature and treatment of shock during the Second World 
War; after the war they pushed their studies into the 
mechanisms, diagnosis, and treatment of congenital heart 
disease, cardiac failure, and chronic lung disease. 

The research achievements occurring at Bellevue dur- 
ing the past fifty years cannot all be collected here, 
though their stories make pleasant telling. But a few can 
be briefly listed: Bellevue pathologist Dr. Douglas 
Symmers introduced the serum treatment of erysipelas 
and wrote the classical description of the Ivmphomas. 
Dr. William Tillett, director of the Third Medical Serv- 
ice from 1938 to 1958, discovered the streptococcal 
enzymes streptodornase and streptokinase, providing 
important insights into the mechanisms of infection, 
blood coagulation, and fibrinolysis. Dr. L. Emmet Holt, 
son of the founder of Babies Hospital, became director 
of the Bellevue Pediatric Service in the 30's and formed 
there a vigorous research program. Under his leadership 
were made the first observations of streptomycin treat- 
ment of tuberculosis, the role of fats and certain sugars 
in the diet, the relation of vitamin deficiencies and over- 
dosages to several congenital malformations, and the 
nature of passive immunization in prevention of infec- 
tious hepatitis among neonates. 



The first use of demerol as an analgesic occurred 
in Bellevue's Department of Anesthesia. The radium 
treatment of carcinoma of the cervix was developed at 
Bellevue. Tremendous advances in thoracic surgery were 
made by Drs. Adrian Lambert, Frank 
Berry, and Robert Wylie. The gluten- 
free diet for the treatment of non- 
tropical sprue was introduced in 
Bellevue's Second Medical Division. 
Important contributions in the sur- 
gery of the pancreas and stomach 
were made by Drs. John MulhoIIand, 
Max Poppel, and William Hinton. 

Another important development at 
Bellevue during this century has been 
the growth of the Psychiatric Service. 
Always under verbal siege because 
of its indescribably wretched condi- 
tions, under its dynamic director from 
1904 to 1934, Menas Gregory, it 
pioneered in environmental, phar- 
macological, and psychological re- 
search and treatment of mental dis- 
ease. From its crowded wards came 
important studies of childhood schizo- 
phrenia; the relation of dietary defi- 
ciencies to alcoholic psychoses and 
the use of insulin shock therapy were 
worked out. The Bellevue-Wechsler 
I.Q. test has achieved wide recogni- 
tion. 

An all too brief mention should 
be made of the first non-military com- 
plete patient rehabilitation service, 
organized at Bellevue in 1947 by Drs. 
George Deaver and Howard Rusk. 

Such, then, has been the history of Bellevue Hospital, 
hastily retold, with too little of the genius, humanity, 
and temperament of its great physicians and surgeons 
preserved. Valentine Mott, David Hosack, John Wake- 
field Francis, Jimmy Wood, Alonzo Clark, Willard 
Parker, Stephen Smith, Abraham Jacobi, Edward 
Dalton, J. Lewis Smith, Lewis Sayre, Edward Janeway, 
Francis Delafield, Austin Flint, William Henry Welch, 
William Stewart Halsted, Hermann Biggs, Alexander 
Lambert, James Alexander Miller, George David Stew- 
art, Warren Coleman, Eugene DuBois, Menas Gregory, 
L. Emmet Holt, Andre Cournand, Dickinson Richards— 
these men were truly giants, not in New York City or 
America alone, but the world over. For 230 years Belle- 
vue has served the poor of New York City. It is a 
tribute to the skill, intellectual vigor, and devotion 
of Bellevue's interns, residents, and attending physi- 
cians that this service has been rendered in constantly 
overcrowded, understaffed, inadequate facilities, sub- 
ject to the whims of political fortune and natural dis- 
aster. 

In 1957 Dr. Dickinson Richards, then director of 
Columbia's First Medical Division, began a campaign 
for yet another new Bellevue. But while the new 
buildings are rising all around the old, one suspects that 
the long tradition of Bellevue Medicine — including the 
chronic shortage of money and excess of patients — 
will continue unchanged: superb medical care, excel- 
lent teaching, outstanding social and scientific achieve- 
ment. 

Gordon L. Noel 

Bellevue Hospital today. 



104 





Mr. Barton 



Disaster drill 
It's only ketchup. 




Impressing the girls with our bodies. 




Tony 







Ruth 






Ed on bass. 



Kaken 




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Christmas 

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John 




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Pres 





Ricky 




Pathologist Extraordinaire 



6-4 and 2.80, pick 'em. 



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Myles 



Cast Party 



Why do you ask? 




Burning the midnight oil 





Sam, Howie, and Gordie relax during Dr. 
Brodey's session on political dermatology. 



Relax, you're in good hands. 





Who wants to work-up a 98 year old lady with 
constipation? 



ill 



A tough day in Group Clinic 




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PL'S Class of 1991 





Bob 

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Soot Levy 



The Hodges 
at the beach 




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Fourth year pruritus! 






Mike 




Home away from home 




Pediatrics subinternship 



Slept through the 

Combined Clinic 

again! 





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John 



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Amos 



Charlie takes a 
coffee break. 





Young Dr. 
Holschuh 



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116 



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117 




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An eminent role in 
medical practice 

• Clinicians throughout the world con- 
sider meprobamate a therapeutic 
standard in the management of anxi- 
ety and tension. 

• The high safety-efficacy ratio of 
'Miltown* has been demonstrated by 
more than a decade of clinical use. 

Miltown 

(meprobamate) 



Indications: Meprobamate is effective 
in relief of anxiety and tension states. 
Also as adjunctive therapy when anxi- 
ety may be a causative or otherwise 
disturbing factor. Although not a hyp- 
notic, meprobamate fosters normal 
sleep through both its anti-anxiety and 
muscle-relaxant properties. 
Contraindications: Previous allergic or 
idiosyncratic reactions to meprobamate 
or meprobamate-containing drugs. 
Precautions: Careful supervision of 
dose and amounts prescribed is advised. 
Consider possibility of dependence, 
particularly in patients with history of 
drug or alcohol addiction; withdraw 
gradually after use for weeks or months 
at excessive dosage. Abrupt withdrawal 
may precipitate recurrence of pre-exist- 
ing symptoms, or withdrawal reactions 
including, rarely, epileptiform seizures. 
Should meprobamate cause drowsiness 
or visual disturbances, the dose should 
be reduced and operation of motor ve- 
hicles or machinery or other activity re- 
quiring alertness should be avoided if 
these symptoms are present. Effects of 
excessive alcohol may possibly be in- 
creased by meprobamate. Grand mal 
seizures may be precipitated in persons 
suffering from both grand and petit 
mal. Prescribe cautiously and in small 
quantities to patients with suicidal tend- 
encies. 

Side effects: Drowsiness may occur 
and, rarely, ataxia, usually controlled 
by decreasing the dose. Allergic or idio- 
syncratic reactions are rare, generally 
developing after one to four doses. 



Mild reactions are characterized by an 
urticarial or erythematous, maculopap- 
ular rash. Acute nonthrombocytopenic 
purpura with peripheral edema and 
fever, transient leukopenia, and a single 
case of fatal bullous dermatitis after ad- 
ministration of meprobamate and pred- 
nisolone havebeen reported. More severe 
and very rare cases of hypersensitivity 
may produce fever, chills, fainting spells, 
angioneurotic edema, bronchial spasms, 
hypotensive crises (1 fatal case), anuria, 
anaphylaxis, stomatitis and proctitis. 
Treatment should be symptomatic in 
such cases, and the drug should not be 
reinstituted. Isolated cases of agran- 
ulocytosis, thrombocytopenic purpura, 
and a single fatal instance of aplastic 
anemia have been reported, but only 
when other drugs known to elicit these 
conditions were given concomitantly. 
Fast EEG activity has been reported, 
usually after excessive meprobamate 
dosage. Suicidal attempts may produce 
lethargy, stupor, ataxia, coma, shock, 
vasomotor and respiratory collapse. 
Usual adult dosage: One or two 400 
mg. tablets three times daily. Doses 
above 2400 mg. daily are not recom- 
mended. 

Supplied: 'Miltown* (meprobamate) is 
available in two strengths; 400 mg. 
scored tablets and 200 mg. coated tab- 
lets. 'Meprotabs' (meprobamate) is 
available as 400 mg. white, coated, un- 
marked tablets. Bejore prescribing, con- 
sul! package circular. 

.ff, Wallace Pharmaceuticals 

\kp Cranbury, N.J, 



WA. 7-3233 

LARRY ORIN 

JEWELER 

Electronically Tested Watch Repair 

4009 Broadway at 168th Street 
New York 32, N. Y. 

Special Discounts for Hospital Personnel 


24 HOUR SERVICE ON COLOR 

MORRIS CAMERA SHOP 

3934 Broadway ( 165th St. ) 
Near Medical Center 

Phone LO. 8-8590 

Special Discounts to Sfudenfj 


Compliments of 

Excel Pastry 

3929 Broadway, near 165 St. 


EVERYTHING For 
HOME & SCHOOL 

WADSWORTH 
5 & 10<C STORES 

4050 Broadway at 170 St. 


T.I: LO. 8-1230 

OLYMPIC BARBER SHOP 

NICK TSAKIIHDIS 

4021 Broadway New York 32 
Bet. 169th and 170th Sti. 


THE MEDICAL CENTER BOOKSTORE 

EXTENDS ITS SINCEREST GOOD WISHES 

to 

THE CLASS OF 1967 



122 



We speak Doctor. 
Present and Future. 



At Chemical New York, we can assist in your pres- 
ent and future personal and professional financial 
plans. With our complete range of services, we can 
meet your every banking need. 

When you first start your practice, we can help you 
with our Professional Finance Plan and a Checking 
Account. 

Later on, as your practice grows, we can help you 
with our Professional Billing Service. Or one of our 
many Personal Trust services. 

So let us help. Stop in at any of our more than 135 
offices and ask for our booklet entitled, "Professional 
Finance Plan." And find out why we're known as 
the bank that works hardest for you . 



Chemical 
NewYork 



Chemical Bank New York Trust Company Member F.D.I. C. 



123 




The Brewsters 



Expert Custom Photography For All Occasions 



ROGER STUDIOS 



PORTRAITS OF DISTINCTION 

4143 Broadway 

New York, New York 10033 

WA 7-7894 

WE KEEP NEGATIVES OF YOUR PHOTOGRAPHS ON FILE 

FOR MANY YEARS AFTER GRADUATION 



124 



SANDOZ 
RESEARCH CENTER 

a new addition to Pharmaceutical Progress 




The new Sandoz Research Center is one of the most modern and best equipped research 
facilities in the nation. Here we will seek to acquire fresh knowledge in the field of 
therapeutics. 

Although much of the research will be at the "basic" level, special emphasis will be 
given to the search for compounds with potential therapeutic value. It is our expectation 
that the outcome of basic and applied research will be new drugs — the sign of steady 
progress toward directed goals. 

The Center dedicates itself to improving the future of man's health by helping to make 
the vision of a cure or treatment for every type of disease become a reality. 



- SANDOZ PHARMACEUTICALS. HANOVER, N J. • ORIGINAL RESEARCH SERVING THE PHYSICIAN 




SANDOZ 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF THE 



P & S ALUMNI 
ASSOCIATION 



To Each Member Of The Class Of 1967 

The P & S Alumni Association Extends 

Its Best Wishes For A Happy 

And Successful Career. 



126 



NELSON'S 

KOSHER DELICATESSEN & RESTAURANT 

CATERERS 

Home Cooked Lunches 

and Full Course Dinners 

Wines - Liquors - Cocktails Served 

4041 Broadway (Corner 170th St.) 
WA. 3-9606 


EXPERT TAILOR & CLEANERS 
J. FRENK 

230 Fort Washington Ave WA 7-3884 
All Kinds of Alterations — Satisfaction Guaranteed 


SELBY L. TURNER 

Life Membership in Leader's Association 
Specialisf In 

INSURANCE FOR PROFESSIONAL MEN 

233 Broadway, New York 7, N.Y. 
BEekman 3-6620 


Manhattan Uniform Center 

4036 Broadway at 170 Street 
Medical Uniforms 
To Fit All Needs 

Telephone LO 8-9 130 


RINGLER-RADOS SURGICAL CORP. 

Surgical & Medical Supplies 

"Only The Best" 

Opposite the Medical Center 

3958 Broadway WA 7-2152-3 


TROPICAL 
GARDENS 

ON BROADWAY 

Bet. 169th and 170th Streets 

WA. 3-8918 


WA. 7-5700 Lie. 532 

M. CITARELLA, Inc. 

WINES AND LIQUORS 

Visit Our Wine Cellar 

3915 BROADWAY near 164th STREET 
NEW YORK 32, N.Y. 



127 



1967 Aesculapian Staff 



Editor 



Robert A. Clark 



Business 



Editorials 



Art 



Robert P. Myers, Manager 
T. Stephen Jones 

Richard Winickoff, Cliairman 
William Johnson 
William Lee 
Gordon Noel 

Fred Silverstein, Chairman 
Richard Frank 



Photography Kenneth Nakano 
Quinn Rosefsky 

Proofreading Patricia Clark 
& Typing Emily Myers 



Captions Harold German, Chairman 

Ronald Allison 
Howard Brensilver 
Roger Christensen 
Thomas Christensen 
Bernard Cohen 
John Gaines 
Richard Hurd 
Gordon Kirschberg 
Benet Kolman 
Kenneth Nakano 
Roger Spier 
Richard Tavernetti 
Barry Wenglin 
Samuel Winner 
Richard Winickoff 



Many long hours and much hard work have gone into the 1967 Aesculapian, 
the 21st edition of the P&S Yearbook. Thanks is due to all those who have helped 
to make this publication possible. Those members of the Class of 1967 who gave 
of their time and talents deserve special thanks. We are particularly grateful 
to Mrs. Elizabeth Wilcox for the use of many of her fine photographs. The 
P&S Alumni Association has been most helpful in many ways. The staff also 
wishes to express thanks to Mr. Emil Schmidt and the firm of Bradbury, Sayles, 
O'Neill, Inc. for their assistance, patience, and good advice. The continued 
support of our advertising patrons is also appreciated. 

We chose to dedicate our yearbook to Dr. Harold W. Brown, a man for 
whom we have great admiration. He is in a sense representative of the entire 
faculty and it is to this remarkable group of men and women that we owe our 
greatest debt of gratitude for their extraordinary generosity in support of the 
yearbook as well as for their success in making out four years here at P&S en- 
joyable and worthwhile. 

Robert A. Clark 












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